ECN Electrical Forum - Discussion Forums for Electricians, Inspectors and Related Professionals
ECN Shout Chat
ShoutChat
Recent Posts
Mini Split voltage
by Garemaret - 06/21/24 04:53 AM
Strobing LEDs
by Anovalight - 06/20/24 03:16 AM
Stuff that happens after we leave
by HotLine1 - 06/17/24 03:53 PM
photocell requirement for metal halide ballasts
by gfretwell - 06/17/24 01:44 PM
Commercial lift stations
by triple - 06/09/24 05:23 PM
New in the Gallery:
This is a new one
This is a new one
by timmp, September 24
Few pics I found
Few pics I found
by timmp, August 15
Who's Online Now
1 members (Scott35), 148 guests, and 10 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Rate Thread
#88155 05/15/04 02:04 PM
Joined: Apr 2001
Posts: 84
D
donles Offline OP
Member
Do I read this article correctly? In a residence, a common disconnect is not required if the circuits do not terminate on the same device or yoke. IOW, I can run 12/3 from two adjacent breakers in the panelboard to a j-box, then split off into two separate 12/2 runs for small appliance circuits? I bet alot of elec's use common trip breakers anyway.
Don

Stay up to Code with the Latest NEC:


>> 2023 NEC & Related Reference & Exam Prep
2023 NEC & Related Reference & Study Guides

Pass Your Exam the FIRST TIME with the Latest NEC & Exam Prep

>> 2020 NEC & Related Reference & Study Guides
 

#88156 05/15/04 02:19 PM
Joined: May 2002
Posts: 1,716
R
Member
Your interpretation is correct except it can also apply to "other" than Dwelling Units, see 210.7(C). The key here is, if we are using a "Multi-Wire circuit it is only one circuit. [Linked Image]

Also the breakers do not have to be ajacent to one another, they only have to be on different legs or phases.

Roger


Link Copied to Clipboard
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5