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Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 2,749
Member
I searched UL.com and found a "sharp edge tester."
http://ulstandardsinfonet.ul.com/catalog/testequippics1.html

The 2005 NEC includes some references concerning sharp edges too.

Have you ever cut your skin when working on older equipment where the original paint has worn away?

I have on cabinet covers, have scars too prove it.

What should be done about this, get everyone a "sharp edge tester?"


Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 9,954
Likes: 34
G
Member
I already have 10, 5 on each hand. I seem to be able to find every sharp edge without even thinking I am getting close to them.


Greg Fretwell
Joined: Apr 2001
Posts: 507
G
Member
I find more sharp edges on new equipment than due to wear on old stuff.

Seems that if I get within five feet of sheetmetal I start to bleed!

Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,391
Moderator
Cuts to hands have become such an issue that the company I work issues gloves and requires them to be worn for certain tasks.

While handling drop in light fixtures is one of the times the gloves must be on.

Most of our guys will cover the inside lip of panel tubs with a strip of electrical tape to cover the sharp edge.


Bob Badger
Construction & Maintenance Electrician
Massachusetts
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 172
W
Member
I thought most troffers were made by gilette anyway.

Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 687
A
Member
I wish they could smooth out the rough edges on mud rings. Seen some cut their hands on the lip of can lights. A flourescent closet light sliced one guy good.

Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 276
T
Member
T-Bar ceiling wires aren't exactly sharp edges, but they are what make me the most paraniod since they always seem to be at head level, going right for your eyes or the top of your head. Sharp pointy steel tie wire and mc that whips and flails are #2 on my list. I find that those blue palmed rubber gloves tame the sharp edges on sheetmetal, it is the lacerations and punctures- the wounds caused by scraping and brushing that cause me the most trouble

Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 276
T
Member
PS- how does that edge tester operate? I am not sure what issuing these to everyone or anyone would accomplish because at the end of the day, the work still has to get done, sharp edges or no.

Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 265
D
Member
I believe those are tools for getting UL listings. UL probably wont list you if your fixture has razor sharp edges, so thats a tool for them to tell you to round it off some.

Joined: Mar 2004
Posts: 193
G
Member
We have found that the stainless steel switch and receptacle plates are extremely sharp. Just had a guy 2 months ago that sliced his index finger opening one of the packages by grabbing the cover and pulling the plastic off at an angle. The plate caught him right in the crease of his finger. He had to go to the hospital and get 6 stitches in his finger to get it to close up.

Seems he had done it that way since he started years ago. Funny how things will catch up with ya.


"If common sense was common, everyone would have it"-not sure, someone here

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