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Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 9
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I need to upgrade the service for an old manufactured home, built on a couple of large I-beams supported by cinder blocks (about 2' clearance). The meter & disco is on a pole near the front corner of the home and the panel is on the back side of the opposite end. Due to terrain, can't trench around back, must go down front, around the end and back (like the letter 'P'). Would it be acceptable to trench underground to the near corner of the home, then run PVC on the ground under the home to the panel stub?

Joined: Jul 2004
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I would strap it up under the home, not lay it on the ground.
I would also put an LB where you make the turn from the riser to the horizontal run under the home so the pull is reasonable.
Your AHJ might want Sch 80 for the riser and/or some supplemental support. A PT 4x4 extending to the bottom of your trench with the SE riser strapped to it should do it.
Down here in the south a piece of Trex might be a better choice since even PT gets eaten by something.


Greg Fretwell
Joined: Jan 2005
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Remember all those times I've said you need to know more than just the NEC? Well, this is one of those times ...

First off, your work is likely to be inspected / approved by an additional authority - a 'mobile home' bureaucracy of some sort. They may even require you to get an additional license if you do anything more than simply run the service; the final hook-up is considered work 'on' the trailer.

The panel in the trailer will have a sticker inside that says something like "To be supplied by a service no greater than 150 amp." Well ... big surprise here ... the HUD weenies understand that to mean that you MUST provide a 150-amp service.

You, as the electrician, are expected to run your service to a point under the trailer, then provide a place for the trailer guy to connect the tail from the panel. The HUD specs want you to run your pipe at least 24" underground ... a bit more than NEC requirements.

Since the whip is of a finite length, you need to be sure you go far enough under the trailer. Hope you like digging while laying on your belly. Don't forget to tuck-tape the moisture barrier when you close the trench.

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"Trailer guy"?
That is interesting. Where is that?
In Florida any unlimited EC can wire a trailer.


Greg Fretwell
Joined: Jan 2005
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Greg, I know the situation from personal experience in Nevada, and I am told that Indiana has the same rules.

To be clear, there are three professionals being discussed here: the licensed electrical contractor, the licensed trailer setter, and the electrician licensed to work on trailers.

The EC license does NOT permit you to so much as change a light bulb in a trailer.

The trailer setter is licensed, not by the Contractors' board, but by the "Mobile Home division." He's allowed to do the hook-up.

The "Mobile Home Division" also licenses electricians to work on trailers. Such electricians can hook up the trailer. This licensing is in addition to, and nearly as expensive as, the license issued by the Contractors' board.

Oddly enough, this change was made to Nevada law after I had my EC licence for about six months.

Joined: Jul 2004
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That is interesting. In Florida an Unlimited EC can pretty much do anything electrical and we have no special license to set a trailer.

The state law (wind code) has made mobile home installations pretty hard to do. I imagine it may have changed but there were no mobile homes that met the wind code a few years ago and that code also applied to moving an existing mobile home. The effect was if you had a mobile home, on a lot, you could stay there but you couldn't replace it or move it.
I imagine someone has found a way to make and certify a wind code mobile home by now tho.
The loophole was the "RV" but if you tried to tie it down by hard wiring the electric and hooking up water it was treated like a mobile home. Of course a lot of people cheat.


Greg Fretwell
Joined: Apr 2002
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Reno:
Thanks for the input from your experiences and areas. As far as I know now, we (NJ) have no 'mobile electrician' or trailer setter type licenses.

A mobile home is set on a slab & secured; and utilities are connected and it is 'skirted'. A NJ Lic EC installs a service/meter and connects the factory installed panel. Most service to slabs are underground and stubbed up; on occasion strapping up to the underside may be necessary, but not the 'norm'. The EC also wires the HVAC Cu.

We record the HUD and NJ certification numbers on the permit app upon inspection, check any work the EC does, and that's it.

Building Inspector is responsible for slab, securing, and skirting. Plumbing for water, sewer and gas connections.



John

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