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Joined: Sep 2002
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C
C-H Offline OP
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Here is something for die-hard ECN members. The rest of you probably don't give a damn and can jump to the next thread. You've been warned...

Remember all that talk of a world standard plug we had last year?

A whole bunch of of different plugs and sockets has been in use in Brazil, apparently with little in the way of regulation. The authorities are now set to tighten up the rules by mandating that cords and plugs come with a Brazilian approval. The plugs in use include the good old Nema 5-15 but now also two versions of the IEC 60906-1: 10A and 20A, both in the NBR 14136. Some manufacturers (e.g. Volex) already offer cordsets with these plugs.

I suppose I have to add another type of plug to my list: Type N.

One of the sources: http://www.ul.com/about/otm/otmv9n3/brazil.html

This is a bit interesting from an Europe vs. America perspective. Other connectors used on both sides of the Atlantic, like the IEC 320 C19 and IEC 309, carry a 16A (100%) rating for Europe and 20A rating with a 80% rule for America. Brazil appears to mix American and European practice and the uprating from 16A to 20A is in line with this practice.

I'll leave it to my fellow ECN members to develop the ideas...

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C-H Offline OP
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Here are more details on Brazilian wiring. In Portugese! I don't understand it...
www.eletrica.ufsj.edu.br/pub/eletrotecnica/norma5410/11_quadros_e_tomadas.pdf

There are a couple of drawings of the plug/socket configuration, but the PDF won't allow copying.

Joined: Aug 2001
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P
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I tried a couple of ways to get the graphics out and post, but no luck. [Linked Image]

Interesting on the configuration they've adopted. I'm not of the exact dimensions, but it looks very much the Swiss standard.

Joined: Aug 2001
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P
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Many thanks to Eli (Belgian) for extracting the images. [Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

Joined: May 2004
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D
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I suppose before we could have a standard world plug we would need a standard world voltage.

Dave

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Slightly off-topic,
There was a brand of vacuum cleaner here (who's name escapes me at the moment) that used a plug and socket configuration like that, to connect the mains cord to the cleaner.

Joined: Dec 2001
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T
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I'd need the measurements of the Swiss plug, but the Brazilian one sure does look Swiss. What voltage are they using there? I seem to remember something about 3x220V?

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From memory, I think they use both 127/220 and 220/380V wye systems.

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C-H Offline OP
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Just how rude am I? I forgot to say thanks to Eli and Paul! Thanks guys! [Linked Image]

Yes, the Swiss plug is almost identical, save for being slightly thicker (19 instead of 17 mm, if I remember correctly) and having the centre pin 5 mm instead of 3 mm from the other pins. In addition, it lacks the sleeves. Not to mention that the 16A version has rectangular pins, 4 x 5 mm. (Vertical)

Paul's right about the voltages.

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No problem C-H. [Linked Image]

Quote
There was a brand of vacuum cleaner here (who's name escapes me at the moment) that used a plug and socket configuration like that, to connect the mains cord to the cleaner.
A very similar configuration with offset center ground pin has been used for years here for extension leads on tools and similar appliances. The pins are much shorter though:

[Linked Image from tlc-direct.co.uk]

There are also versions without the ground pin which are reversible. They became quite common on double-insulated garden power tools:

[Linked Image from tlc-direct.co.uk]


[This message has been edited by pauluk (edited 10-05-2004).]


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