ECN Electrical Forum - Discussion Forums for Electricians, Inspectors and Related Professionals
ECN Shout Chat
Top Posters(30 Days)
Potseal 11
Recent Posts
600 KW 120/208 3 Phase Y protection
by Yooperup. 07/24/17 12:20 PM
1913 American Electrician's Handbook
by gfretwell. 07/20/17 01:08 PM
Green House wiring
by ghost307. 07/20/17 09:10 AM
Permit Snafus...AHJs and Contractors Jump in
by HotLine1. 07/18/17 08:06 PM
New in the Gallery:
SE cable question
Popular Topics(Views)
239,333 Are you busy
174,807 Re: Forum
167,184 Need opinion
Who's Online Now
0 registered members (), 55 guests, and 9 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Rate This Thread
#146070 - 09/25/06 12:11 PM mechanical protection  
Kenbo  Offline
Member
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 233
Scotland
How do detrmine the level of mechanical protection required, using the UK 16th regs

senario....
Install in a domestic garage one end, a work bench is fitted. So we know the T&E cabeling requires to be in conduit. But how do you decide if it should be plastic conduit or metal conduit?

Quote from 16th regs

522-06 Impact (AG)

522-06-02 In a fixed installation where an impact of medium severity (AG2) or high severity(AG3) can occur, protection shall be afforded by:
(i) the mechanical charicteristics of of the wiring system,or
(ii) the location selected,or
(iii) the provision of additional local or general mechanical protection,
or by any combination of the above.

So how do we determine the levels of severity, AG2 and AG3?


der Großvater

Test Equipment:
Large Selection of Test Equipment For Electrical, HVAC, Test & Measurement
Large Selection of Test Equipment For Electrical, HVAC, Test & Measurement

#146071 - 09/25/06 12:38 PM Re: mechanical protection  
Trumpy  Offline


Member
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,217
SI,New Zealand
Hi Ken,
Am I to assume that the walls of the garage will be un-lined (bare studs, etc) around the workbench area?.
If it were lined, I would say that additional protection is not required, where the T+E wiring runs through the studs and dwangs(nogs).
But lets get away from that silly idea,
could you not use something like say mini-trunking?.
One thing I did in a garage here recently was, used a length of PVC ducting along the back of the workbench (200mm above the bench surface) and had 4-way socket-outlets every 2 metres along the ducting and built the sockets into the ducting itself.
Quote
So how do we determine the levels of severity, AG2 and AG3?

I've never heard of this system before, is this a new thing?.
One thing I do know though Ken, the IP Code (Ingress Protection), has always had a third number to denote impact resistance for electrical enclosures and such materials, apparently the French use it, I'm not sure if it caught on anywhere else in Europe, I know that a few people here were never aware of it, or indeed the IP Code itself!. [Linked Image]
Just my $0.02 worth.


Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

#146072 - 09/25/06 01:57 PM Re: mechanical protection  
Kenbo  Offline
Member
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 233
Scotland
Trumpy no probs mate.
If everyone that posted here payed their 2 cents worth in cash I would be a millionair [Linked Image]

The garage is brick built.

This is just a table top exercise for one of my better students. Now normaly I would just run it in plastic conduit.
But when he asked if he should use plastic or metal I thought I would be smart and told him to look it up in the regs. But then he found out the regs only state what I have quoted.
I have never heard of this "impact rating" before and I can not find an expination in the regs for it.

The regulations here are notoriusly dificult to understand. So much so you get a certificated course just to be able read them (no joke) ask any UK electrician.
Still that is what sorts out the real electricians from the odd job guys...........


der Großvater

#146073 - 09/25/06 02:00 PM Re: mechanical protection  
Kenbo  Offline
Member
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 233
Scotland
Should have added

We do use the IP rating in the UK. It works well personaly I think it is a great idea.


der Großvater

#146074 - 09/25/06 02:27 PM Re: mechanical protection  
Trumpy  Offline


Member
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,217
SI,New Zealand
Ahh that explains a lot Ken.
On the surface installation.
I was assuming that the building was timber-framed. Grrr. [Linked Image]
Not long after I first posted the reply, I realised that the building might be either brick or building block construction.
I always thought that Metallic conduit was reserved for Industrial places, not a Domestic installation.
Heavy-Duty PVC is used here in Industrial places and it affords good mechanical protection, it can be identified by it's Orange colour.


Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

#146075 - 09/26/06 04:33 AM Re: mechanical protection  
pauluk  Offline
Member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,520
Norfolk, England
I'm not familiar with this AG system of measurement either. I can't see the typical domestic garage requiring metallic conduit,except perhaps in one or two specific areas if there was a real likelihood of damaga, e.g. a low-level run right where it could be hit with big trolley jacks or such like.

I just recently finished the wiring for a neighbor's new garage and workshop and used black PVC conduit throughout. (Not T&E though, just 2.5 singles.)


#146076 - 09/26/06 05:13 AM Re: mechanical protection  
kiwi  Offline
Member
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 354
christchurch new zealand
All I can find in our regs are phrases like "Adequately protected against mechanical damage". Which means it's up to us to decide wether to use plastic or metal conduit.

I've always wondered what type of impact would break plastic conduit pipe but not damage metal pipe ? Any ideas ?


#146077 - 09/27/06 08:53 AM Re: mechanical protection  
briselec  Offline
Member
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 141
Brisbane, Australia
The Australian wiring rules are just as vague and useless on the matter of determining the level of mechanical protection.
What really gets me is how corrugated PVC and rigid PVC conduit are both called medium duty yet corry can easily be crushed and cut open with a knife...what the?


#146078 - 09/27/06 10:23 AM Re: mechanical protection  
Kenbo  Offline
Member
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 233
Scotland
I contacted "Kopex" last night through their web site and put this question to them.

Will let you know what reply I get

I also orderd a cataloge so see if there is any answer there for you briselec.


der Großvater


Member Spotlight
richard
richard
L.I. New York
Posts: 95
Joined: August 2003
Show All Member Profiles 
Featured:

2017 NEC and Related
2017 NEC
Now Available!

Shout Box
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.0
Page Time: 0.016s Queries: 14 (0.002s) Memory: 0.8033 MB (Peak: 0.9698 MB) Zlib enabled. Server Time: 2017-07-26 02:32:00 UTC