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#137968 - 08/04/03 12:33 PM Some UK electrical safety background info  
C-H  Offline
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Joined: Sep 2002
Posts: 1,497
Stockholm, Sweden


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#137969 - 08/04/03 01:25 PM Re: Some UK electrical safety background info  
SvenNYC  Offline
Member
Joined: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,691
New York City
I'm surprised that installing a simple BS-1363 plug is outside the scope of most consumers, according to this website.

How hard can it be?

1) Unscrew the casing,

2) Prepare the cord.

3) Connect brown to live (L), blue to neutral (N), green/yellow to ground (E). Tighten terminals firmly.

4) Install appropriate fuse (3, 5 or 13 amp) for the appliance.

5) Fasten the strain relief/cord grip so the jaws bite over the jacket (not the individual conductors)

6) Screw the plug closed.

You're set!

Unbelievable [Linked Image]

And its much safer than our American plugs, most of which have exposed terminals in the face and the only thing protecting them is a thin plastic disk or tab (in the case of flat ones):

[Linked Image]

[This message has been edited by SvenNYC (edited 08-04-2003).]


#137970 - 08/04/03 03:07 PM Re: Some UK electrical safety background info  
djk  Offline
Member
Joined: Dec 2002
Posts: 1,237
Ireland
I've found rewirable schuko plugs, at least the varieties I've come across, an absolute nightmare to wire. They're so fiddly! Particularly the ground connection!

It's worth noting that BS1363 plugs are moulded on to all appliences here since the mid 90.

On another point, I notice that they only recomend a min of 6 sockets for a kitchen! In Ireland we've a recomended min. of 10.


[This message has been edited by djk (edited 08-04-2003).]


#137971 - 08/04/03 03:38 PM Re: Some UK electrical safety background info  
SvenNYC  Offline
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Joined: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,691
New York City
You're not the only one DJK.

I've rewired a few Schuko type plugs myself and they're just a pain, especially when you're using .75mm x 3 flex and you have to ball the peeled conductors up in order for the terminal screw to bite down.

I also once wired a new Europlug to the flex of one my cassette players (it's 110/220 volt switchable). The mail-order distributor I bought three of them from to experiment from thought you soldered it to the wires. But no, you have to crimp it on. [Linked Image]

I'm sure there are some rewireable one sold in the EU. There better be....just like we have replacement two-pin plugs here in the West. Can you imagine the skinny flex of a table lamp going into a bulky plug better designed for an electric washingmachine? [Linked Image]


#137972 - 08/04/03 09:33 PM Re: Some UK electrical safety background info  
djk  Offline
Member
Joined: Dec 2002
Posts: 1,237
Ireland
SvenNYC:

Yeah there are rewireable "Europlugs" available. I've used them in france, quite a neat design: all plastic and seems very safe.

Well all of our lamps have skinny little cables running into the same BS1363 plugs that you'd use to connect a washing machine albeit with a 3amp fuse inside!

I also remember seeing christmas lights connected to a 15amp BS546 plug. The plug is about the size of a travel iron :P With pins as fat as your index finger.. Could prob. easily carry 35+ Amps! Completely over specified


#137973 - 08/04/03 11:14 PM Re: Some UK electrical safety background info  
NORCAL  Offline
Member
Joined: Sep 2002
Posts: 869
SVEN NYC,

The live front plug you show has been prohibited by the NEC since 01/01/78,see 1975 NEC 410-56(d).


#137974 - 08/05/03 08:17 AM Re: Some UK electrical safety background info  
SvenNYC  Offline
Member
Joined: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,691
New York City
Norcal,

I know. However that doesn't stop it from being manufactured and sold in practically every hardware store here in the city and (I assume) the country. [Linked Image]


#137975 - 08/05/03 11:00 PM Re: Some UK electrical safety background info  
classicsat  Offline
Member
Joined: Nov 2002
Posts: 456
Most repuatble outlets in Canada don't sell them.


#137976 - 08/06/03 07:21 AM Re: Some UK electrical safety background info  
pauluk  Offline
Member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,520
Norfolk, England
What exactly is the big problem with these "live front" plugs?

Even if the protective disk is missing, once the plug is seated into a wall receptacle nobody can touch the connections.

The only place where I see it might be possible is if a plug such as the one pictured were connected to a flat socket on the end of a 2-wire extension cord.

Was this why they were banned by the NEC?


#137977 - 08/06/03 11:08 AM Re: Some UK electrical safety background info  
SvenNYC  Offline
Member
Joined: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,691
New York City
That is exactly one of the reasons they were "banned."

Also, people are morons. They don't install the disk, they don't twist the wires properly around the terminal screws so you got little strands of wire sticking out the sides sometimes.

The insulating disks used to be fiber, which would eventually crumble over the years (if it didn't get lost first). At least now the disk is plastic and it does fit tigher.

Plug one of these improperly installed suckers into a socket with a metal plate and you risk the chance of a small fireworks display. [Linked Image]

But hey....like I said. A lot of good the NEC did by "banning" them when you can still easily buy them in the USA (and even Mexico, even if they don't meet NOM standards).

They are popular with old fan, lamp and radio repairers/collectors since they "look right" for the job. I have a box full of them at home.

You can also still buy new cloth-wrapped lamp flex in many lighting supply stores.

Of course it's also non-UL listed.... [Linked Image]

[This message has been edited by SvenNYC (edited 08-06-2003).]



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