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Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 20
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ROSLYN Offline OP
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There is abit of confusion, I keep getting diffrent answers, both from inspectors, NYS code division & the Manfuactor. The Rating on a High Hat " Air Tight " There are two type of cans in use, both approved !! Type 1 - AT- Can Only <> Type 2 - Can Requires Trim to comply to AT Rating. Most inspectors approve both, but there are a select few who only allow type 1 to be installed. What is the story about this, who has the final answer, Don't say the inspector. ( PS-I have a job, inspected by two diffrent firms: one approved both types, the other did not... ) You tell me !!

2017 / 2014 NEC & Related Books and Study Guides
Joined: Apr 2002
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Roslyn:
FWIW, over here in NJ, the Building Insp enforce the Energy Sub-Code, Not the Elec AHJ.

I gave all my contractors a "heads-up" about this, and it appears that there are only a few problems.

The complete assembly has to be rated/listed/labeled as an air tight assembly. That's all.

John


John
Joined: Jan 2002
Posts: 1,457
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I don't see what the issue is. If You have a can rated "air tight" it will say so. If you have a can rated "air tight" only with certain trims it will say so. Where is the confusion? Are there different levels of "air tight"? If so the building code should specify what is required. This is not an NEC issue nor should it be an electrical inspector issue.

Joined: Jun 2003
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Roslyn
The residential building code and the Energy conservation code are the two documents that NYState is following.


502.1.3 Recessed Lighting fixtures.


This is the reference

If you are using an "airseal" or "airlock" type fixture, and you are installing the proper trim as per the labeling, you can install either type of fixture.

Pierre


Pierre Belarge
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 20
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ROSLYN Offline OP
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YES YES !! You are all correct, The problem is that One Inspection Firm reads the code in a different view. Air Tight is Can only - No Trims, But I want to challange them about this ruling ( AJH ). Other Firms & Building inspectors all aprove both types. This firm feels they are correct & everybody is wrong. I am stuck with an open inspection & can not switch at this time, but others have inspected the site in respect to this issue, and find nothing wrong. Who has the final word ??

Joined: Jan 2002
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E
Member
Show them the paper work for what you are installing.

Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 20
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ROSLYN Offline OP
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To the electricians out there, On Long Island
local towns & villages " Sub Contract " electrical inspection firms to do the electrical inspections. The 6 inspection firms, work for the towns: in reguards to the Air Tight Issue, and I know the NYS code in back of my hand. The Town overided the electrical inspector, that the Fixtures ( 2 Types ) are approved for installation. The inspector went beyond his call on this issue.

Joined: Apr 2001
Posts: 518
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Hate to say it, Roslyn, but the AHJ ("inspector" get to make the call. That's his job.
Now, inspectors (despite assertions to the contrary) are human, and may err, or be incompletely informed, just like the rest of us. The polite thing to do in that case is to research the issue, and persent him with the answer to his concern.

I just installed some Halo fixtures, and was surprised to see that they now come with a gasket. Reading the fine print of the instructions, I found:
"For State of Washington approved Air-Tite (R) housings- apply supplied gasket to ceiling and wrap around inside of housing..."
In other words, the install has to follow the directions. Different rules are likely with differing fixtures, or in different jurisdictions.

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Here is a situation that I see everyday in NY State - where I inspect. We do not follow the NEC for 1&2 family dwellings with services 400 amps and smaller, we follow the NY State Residential Building Code, of which the bulk of the electrical requirements come from chapters 33-42. We also follow the Energy Conservation Construction Code. Both of these documents have requirements regarding the lighting requirements as to "penatrating the building envelope".

The jist of what I am trying to say is, that without the documents, it is hard to tell from one person to another what the actual requirements are. Purchase the documents and carry them in the truck. When you need them, they are right there.

Pierre


Pierre Belarge

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