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#51291 05/09/05 07:57 PM
Joined: Jan 2005
Posts: 354
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pdh Offline
Member
I'm currently designing my own house. Hopefully it will begin at some point in a few years. But for now, I'm just designing all the details as I learn enough about them to do so. The elctrical followed the floor plan because that's something I'm more familiar with. The actual construction work will not be a DIY project, though I may end up being my own co-GC on it. That means I will be hiring local (wherever local ends up being) electrician(s) to do the actual work.

So I have this question. What would you guys think about a custom new home construction job that involved already designed wiring, and already specified (or maybe even already purchased) components and materials? If it specifies not only which outlets are on which circuits, but also which position in which panel it goes to, does this kind of design detail make your job easier or harder?

#51292 05/09/05 08:16 PM
Joined: Jan 2005
Posts: 354
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pdh Offline
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sparkync: In a larger house (more bedrooms), I'd think it would be easier to separate lights and outlets because you would be able to put more bedrooms on a common lights-only circuit, then divide up the outlets according to load needs, keeping them apart from the lights.

#51293 05/09/05 09:52 PM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 12
C
Member
How do you get a competitive bid for a house when u seperate the lights and receps in beds.......?now you have created more arc-fault circuits ie. more money! When was the last time you put any kind of a load in a bedroom that even remotly made you think about keeping them seperate?

#51294 05/10/05 08:05 AM
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 51
M
Member
here in ny we are not required yet to have to use the arc faults.. which is nice, they are just getting around to using the 2002 code... go figure..

#51295 05/10/05 09:28 AM
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 693
L
Member
As I noted in my previous post, we're using the '99 NEC here in Va.,, not the '02, so only bedroom receptacle circuits require AFCI protection, not all bedroom outlets.

Therefore, I saved money because I stretched the single bedroom receptacle circuit to all three bedrooms. Had I fed ceiling lights alos, I would have needed two circuits.

The house is a Habitat for Humanity house, so it's probably around 1000 sq.ft.; we didn't measure it. There are three bedrooms, and four receptacles in each bedroom.


Larry Fine
Fine Electric Co.
fineelectricco.com
#51296 05/10/05 05:03 PM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 12
C
Member
what ever

#51297 05/10/05 08:09 PM
Joined: Oct 2002
Posts: 830
S
Member
pdh, yea, never thought of that, bigger house give more advantage to separate them. My self, I never really seen the need to separate them. Cost more money in wire and labor to bypass a receptacle that is maybe just under the switch box, to go to another room. Plus I don't really see the advantage of it. But that's just my opinion. Here in NC we have to put everything on the AFCI circuit, so like I said before, it gets more expensive, and around here, you don't usually get to name your price on house wiring. You either cut it down or don't get the job. Sometimes you still don't get the job [Linked Image]
Steve...

#51298 05/10/05 09:12 PM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 706
T
Member
In the Northern Illinois area the lights and duplexes have been separate for decades. As for bedroom loads, hair dryers and vacuum cleaners are common enough to justify 20-amp circuits. You rarely see that though since it's all low-bid work.

Dave

#51299 05/10/05 09:31 PM
Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 687
A
Member
Tiger Dave,

Did you change your name from Dave 55?

Tom

#51300 05/10/05 10:14 PM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 706
T
Member
New business, new name, same Dave.

Dave

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