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Re: Residential load calculation question [Re: schenimann] #204062 11/06/11 09:13 PM
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 265
W
wire_twister Offline
Member
Go with the 400a service, no doubt something will be added. With all that floor space 10kw may be a little light for a guess on heat strips anyway. As far as baseboard outlets, if you can(do) use plastic boxes, carlon makes an adjustable one with a metal bracket. I used close to 100 of them on the last house I did, you can put em in fast, let the carpenters cut the trim around them, then adjust the depth after the trim is up. A word of caution, Romex also makes a box that is adjustable, but not nearly as easily once the trim is up, take a look at both and the difference is easy to see.


Jimmy

Life is tough, Life is tougher when you are stupid
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Re: Residential load calculation question [Re: schenimann] #204063 11/07/11 12:06 AM
Joined: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,273
T
Tesla Offline
Member
BB outlets are not compliant with the Disabilities Act.

They are too low.

I'm amazed that they didn't get stopped at plan check.

Federal law stipulates that all switches stay below 48" AFF and that receptacles stay above 12" AFF. These are the limits faced by anyone in a wheel chair. They apply to all general use switches and receptacles.

I doubt there is an exception for residential construction.

By your statements that is what we're talking about.

I'd ask them how they can get around the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Get back with us when you have a response.


Tesla
Re: Residential load calculation question [Re: schenimann] #204065 11/07/11 12:17 AM
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 13
SactoCliff Offline
Member
The ADA does not apply to residences.

Commercial, institutional, etc., yes. Not to private homes.

Not to say that it's not a good idea to install receptacles high and switches low. We're all gonna get old (if we're lucky).

Cliff

Re: Residential load calculation question [Re: schenimann] #204069 11/07/11 11:00 AM
Joined: Feb 2002
Posts: 2,233
H
harold endean Offline
Member
I see a lot of baseboard receptacles in the new houses that I inspect. I think another reason for BB recpt. is that so many people are putting up chair rails and decorative moldings and there is nothing worse than trying to put up molding with a receptacle right in the way. So by having them in the BB, you don't have those problems.

Re: Residential load calculation question [Re: schenimann] #204070 11/07/11 11:58 AM
Joined: Jan 2005
Posts: 5,316
renosteinke Offline
Cat Servant
Member
"Federal law says ..."

Just a reminder to check your assumptions, see what the law REALLY says.

Not only does the law NOT apply to residential work, it also does not apply to most commercial / industrial locations.

Most telling of all, the various artwork and specifications you see are NOT the Federal requirements- even though they're published as part of the CFR. They're specifically described as non-mandated guides in an appendix.

Alas, if you do commercial work, many times these 'suggestions' are included as mandatory job specifications.

Re: Residential load calculation question [Re: schenimann] #204071 11/07/11 12:01 PM
Joined: Jan 2005
Posts: 5,316
renosteinke Offline
Cat Servant
Member
A reminder regarding 400-amp services ....

There are two types. One is a true 400-amp service, with a current transformer. The other is really a 320-amp service{ that is, a 320-amp meter base that can handle surges to 400 amps.

If your load calculations exceed 320 amps, you get to put in the more expensive CT-type service.

Talk to the PoCo; Our OP might be able to simply install a trough with provision to add more meters / services to serve the future additions.

Re: Residential load calculation question [Re: schenimann] #204075 11/07/11 04:20 PM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 984
G
ghost307 Offline
Member
I'd recommend tha 400A service, if only to keep from being the guy blamed when the elevator gets added and they have to upgrade the new electrical service.

I hate being called names...even in absentia.


Ghost307
Re: Residential load calculation question [Re: schenimann] #204174 11/17/11 11:50 PM
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 193
S
schenimann Offline OP
Member
I turned in the bid for the house. Thanks for the help. Next question: They are wanting to add a 20kw gen to the bid. I have only installed 16kw and smaller on a 200 amp service. What is the best set-up for this on the 400 amp service?

They are also possibly looking at LED 6" cans(about 100). Any input?



Re: Residential load calculation question [Re: schenimann] #204182 11/18/11 11:44 AM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 984
G
ghost307 Offline
Member
You're probably looking at recircuiting the loads that they want on the generator to a separate panel. That way you can use an ATS sized to the generator. If they want the whole place on the generator (even if they turn most everything else off) you will need to install a 400A ATS.

If the former, I'd figure it as a new service panel, generator and the smaller ATS.
If the latter, I'd add in a 400 A ATS with the generator and plan on spending a lot of time explaing how much of their new house will and won't be able to powered during an outage.

As to the LED downlights, I've only used the Juno product, but I think that they're all still working the bugs out of the technology...otherwise all of the major manufacturers would be offering them. If you get an off-brand, be sure to check out the UL Listing in case the AHJ wants to hold your feet to the fire on it.


Ghost307
Re: Residential load calculation question [Re: schenimann] #204209 11/21/11 07:11 AM
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 3
K
knowledge Offline
New Member
well why wont the 320 amp service be enough or adequate

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