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Re: Euro outlet in US kitchen [Re: SteveFehr] #195699 08/18/10 08:15 PM
Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,803
Alan Belson Offline
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Yeah, lookit what happened to this dope, connecting a Euro-style washing machine to 240v 60hz. First the door fell off the top, then it dang near caught fire - the spin cycle couldn't cope with the lamination saturation! Then the moron tried to wash bricks in it too!
They ain't designed to do both! laugh

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=364dzVsBs2o&feature=player_embedded&has_verified=1


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Re: Euro outlet in US kitchen [Re: gfretwell] #195741 08/20/10 07:53 AM
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IanR Offline
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"I guess 3kw does get the coffee going right away. Just counting on my fingers I think that 10200 BTU/H ends up boiling a quart of water in less than 2 minutes assuming a room temperature start. I guess I am not in that big a hurry.
I suppose the next question is, can you extract the "speed" from the bean that fast?"

Greg, I think more often than not, it is the 3KW tea kettles that people are interested in, myself included. I have already installed a BS1363 in my kitchen, for my British spec tea kettle. Shhh, dont tell my local insp. whistle

Last edited by IanR; 08/20/10 07:56 AM.
Re: Euro outlet in US kitchen [Re: IanR] #196059 09/08/10 12:17 PM
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Texas_Ranger Offline
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It's not 100% true that all European countries use 230/400V, but you can most definitely expect some form of 230V 50Hz (accepted voltage tolerance +/- 10%) at a Schuko socket, either live and grounded conductor from a 230/400V 4 wire Y transformer or two live conductors from a 133/230V Y (grounded conductor not supplied to customer). Supposedly there are even 115/230V 1ph 3w transformers used in some remote areas of Germany. To make it short, all appliances have to be designed to work on either 230V hot to neutral or 230V hot to hot, however, regulations don't necessarily require the appliance to be totally isolated when switched off, e.g. single pole light switches are perfectly legal on a 133/230V system, even though one terminal of the Edison socket is always hot (needs to be the tip, not the screw shell though).

Edit: on washing machines I heard that the pump motors (split pole motors) are the biggest issue as they want exactly their specified frequency. Now that Euro style front loaders are sold regularly in the US I can't really see any reason to import a European machine.

Last edited by Texas_Ranger; 09/08/10 12:28 PM.
Re: Euro outlet in US kitchen [Re: SteveFehr] #214536 12/19/14 09:57 AM
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Meadow Offline
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A bit late in the discussion, but NEC 210.6 (A)(2) actually wants any appliance that runs below 1440 VA to be 120 volts. Personally I think its one of the dumbest rules, but it might be something an inspector may site for say an alarm clock or Euro radio.

And yes, Ive tried the 240 volt 3KW Panini grill and kettle before. Once you try, it changes you. You never go back laugh

Re: Euro outlet in US kitchen [Re: SteveFehr] #214537 12/19/14 01:42 PM
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gfretwell Online Content
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That has a very limited application. It says "In dwelling units and guest rooms or guest suites of hotels, motels, and similar occupancies...".


Greg Fretwell
Re: Euro outlet in US kitchen [Re: SteveFehr] #214541 12/19/14 06:58 PM
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renosteinke Offline
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Does anyone else see irony or contradiction here?

Doesn't the NFPA strive to make the NEC an 'international' code? Aren't they continually foisting things on us (like TR receptacles) simply because they're used elsewhere?

Yet, here they go, trying to protect us from Euro appliances.

Re: Euro outlet in US kitchen [Re: renosteinke] #214546 12/20/14 10:20 AM
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Meadow Offline
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Originally Posted by renosteinke
Does anyone else see irony or contradiction here?

Doesn't the NFPA strive to make the NEC an 'international' code? Aren't they continually foisting things on us (like TR receptacles) simply because they're used elsewhere?

Yet, here they go, trying to protect us from Euro appliances.


I do, and yes I agree. Code is supposed to be international, but this very code section goes against that. IMO, I don't know when it was added, but it could be an old hold over from way back when.

I've been thinking about sending in a proposal down the road, wonder what the would say about it?

Re: Euro outlet in US kitchen [Re: SteveFehr] #214548 12/20/14 02:23 PM
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gfretwell Online Content
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Again I will point out, NEC 210.6 (A)(2) only applies to "dwelling units and guest rooms or guest suites of hotels, motels, and similar occupancies..."

It has no bearing on what you can do in your home. It only affects you in a hotel room.

There is absolutely nothing to keep you from installing a 240v receptacle in your kitchen for your European tea kettle.
Conscience may want you to put a GFCI on that outlet but 210.8(A) doesn't.


Greg Fretwell
Re: Euro outlet in US kitchen [Re: SteveFehr] #214553 12/20/14 04:52 PM
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sparkyinak Offline
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This is an long running post of days ago but it is the first for me. I did not read through 5 pages of comment so I apologize before hand if it duplicates someone else's comment.
If I understood the OP, correctly, why would you want to even do that? European power supply is 240V at 50Hz. No telling how the heating element perform and if it has any electronics in it, what will happen to them. I'm no engineer but I would think the heating element will run a little hotter that could degrade the heating element because it may be operation out if its design element.


Keep in mind, my comments are based on only the OP


"Live Awesome!" - Kevin Carosa
Re: Euro outlet in US kitchen [Re: gfretwell] #214559 12/20/14 06:31 PM
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Meadow Offline
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Originally Posted by gfretwell
Again I will point out, NEC 210.6 (A)(2) only applies to "dwelling units and guest rooms or guest suites of hotels, motels, and similar occupancies..."

It has no bearing on what you can do in your home. It only affects you in a hotel room.

There is absolutely nothing to keep you from installing a 240v receptacle in your kitchen for your European tea kettle.
Conscience may want you to put a GFCI on that outlet but 210.8(A) doesn't.


But isn't a dwelling considered a home? I guess the terminology might be off on my part.

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