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#178786 06/11/08 10:32 PM
Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 174
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bot540 Offline OP
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I am bidding on a job installing 2 15' post lights. What size tube do I need to figure on pouring and do I need to put rebar in the concrete. Each pole will have 2 150 watt metal halide fixtures.


Jesus may have been a capenter,but God was an electrician.Genesis1:3
bot540 #178793 06/12/08 06:45 AM
Joined: Apr 2003
Posts: 139
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This is a matter that is subject to your local building codes. Here in Florida, things like this need to be engineered for wind-born debris and high velocity hurricane zones. In your area, you may even have some seismic issues to consider.

Contact the local AHJ for some guidance.


Bryan P. Holland, ECO.
Secretary - IAEI Florida Chapter
BPHgravity #178795 06/12/08 09:41 AM
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From my experience (in Florida), the "guidance" will be "bring us engineered plans". The strange thing is when you get to the engineer he will be working off some handout outs from the state, (not doing any real calculations).
I don't know why the building department won't just give you the handout.


Greg Fretwell
gfretwell #178796 06/12/08 10:32 AM
Joined: Jan 2005
Posts: 5,316
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In general, what you'll end up with will look something like this:

The concrete base will be 5 ft deep and 16" diameter. You will likely have someone make up s rebar "chair" .. a 12" square rebar framework that runs the length of the pour. Your post bolts will be attached to this with tie wire.

You'll make a plywood template of the post base, to align the bolts, and hold them in place while the concrete sets. The bolts will likely be 1" diameter.

In the pour will also bee a PVC raceway for the wires.

The post will be at least 4" square tube, with a handhole for making your connections at the base. A 6" tube is better, if for nothing else but room for your hands to work the wires.

gfretwell #178797 06/12/08 11:16 AM
Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,213
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Originally Posted by gfretwell
From my experience (in Florida), the "guidance" will be "bring us engineered plans". The strange thing is when you get to the engineer he will be working off some handout outs from the state, (not doing any real calculations).
I don't know why the building department won't just give you the handout.
They probably could, but there are always caveots and exceptions. So, they require it be engineered, trusting the engineer will know where the standard details can and can't apply, and will engineer the proper solution for each job. Most of the time, if it's simple, it'll be the standard drawing or a very close derivative.

SteveFehr #178803 06/12/08 03:10 PM
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 7,279
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Bot:
FWIW, you may want to try RUUD Lighting. They offer a lot of customer services, and provide engineering data/info.



John
HotLine1 #178804 06/12/08 04:16 PM
Joined: Oct 2002
Posts: 482
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The manufacturer of the poles/fixtures should be happy to provide you with guidelines and/or illustrations that you can present to your AHJ for approval/modification. They should also provide you with a template and the hardware (l-bolts) required for their poles (sans the rebar cage and concrete).

HotLine1 provided you with great guidance, as Ruud is probably my favorite lighting company. They are not only helpful and polite, they provide a very good product and assistance upon request.

Here's a HUGE bonus: they deal with contractors DIRECT. This saves a ton of time and money when you don't have to get quotes, delivery, call backs, etc. from a supply house as a middleman. You can quote a client right out of their catalog, which is impossible with most lighting companies.

Here's their web site:

http://www.ruudlighting.com/

Good luck!

bot540 #178820 06/12/08 09:08 PM
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bot540 Offline OP
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Thanks, I did contact Ruud before coming home and reading this. The said 18" was the minimum and rebar was up to the AHJ. Ruud is an awsome company and fortunately they're only a 45 minute drive from my shop.


Jesus may have been a capenter,but God was an electrician.Genesis1:3
bot540 #178886 06/14/08 08:49 PM
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 2,721
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One of the Random jokes at our Office:

Question (from 'Someone'):
"Did You Call RUUD"?

Answer (by 'Someone' - usually me):
"No, I was very polite when I called!"

smile smile smile smile

Seriously though, RUUD is a very good Company to deal with - as they will supply Pole Base documentation for use with their products, return Lighting Layouts (foot-candle levels at points) quickly, and are very prompt + detailed with quotations.

They tend to bombard with quotation follow-ups if you do not respond within a couple days!, but that's not too bad.

Among the many Manufaturers out there, RUUD, along with Metalux (Cooper) and GVA are working with us (the Company I am an injunear with) to narrow down the issues and effects that Sub Zero Environments have on Fluorescent Lamps - more specifcally, with T5 HO Lamps.

In the "Warehouse Freezers", where Temperatures range from 0ºC down to -30ºC, the net output Lumens for Fluorescent Lamps is reduced between 50 - 70% respectively, with a corresponding downward shift in Color towards red (from 5000K down to 4100K; and even as low as 3500K).

Additionally, when Fixtures are located within 10 - 15 feet of an Evaporator - such as being located in the path of air leaving the Evap., light levels may fall as low as 20% the net Lumens for the Fixture, and Color 'Red-Shifts' (in lieu of a better term) down as low as 2700K.

It's a really serious issue with very little documentation / study involved.

Woops, got off topic again!!! eek

Scott

BTW the Term 'Red-Shift' really does not apply here, as the Light emmited from the Lamps is not accelerating away rapidly, causing the White Light to 'Red-Shift'...

(Astrophysics is not an observed Science in the Warehouse Freezers - unless said Freezer is a lone Entity floating through Space heading towards a Black Hole; then it is safe to say the 'Red-Shift' Term is very accurate!!!)

Scott35


Scott " 35 " Thompson
Just Say NO To Green Eggs And Ham!
Scott35 #178900 06/15/08 08:36 AM
Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 4,287
Member
.....and Ruud Lighting sends you a yummy pastry at Christmas!

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