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Re: diazed fuses [Re: annemarie1] #220454 01/18/20 02:41 PM
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 2,485
T
Texas_Ranger Offline
Member
The last video doesn't look Ukrainian to me, the title is Czech and so is the warning label above the fuses. Apart from being aluminium and usually TN-C, older Czech wiring is usually surprisingly decent, plenty of circuits and healthily-sized wires (1.5 mm2 copper/2.5 mm2 Al for 10 A lighting circuits, 2.5 Cu or 4 Al for 16 A socket circuits). A while ago I posted pictures from an 1890s flat in Prague, rewired in the 70s I guess. IIRC the 1-bedroom place (kitchen, hall, sitting room, bedroom, bathroom) had two lighting circuits, two socket circuits, even a dedicated circuit for the extractor fan in the bathroom!

By comparison, yesterday I did some work in a very similar place in Vienna, rewired in 1969 and that had two general-purpose circuits and one oven circuit - period. The oven on a 10 A Diazed fuse wasn't such a bright idea, the base was completely burned! I only replaced a few light switches, once the place is cleared out the landlord will surely have it completely rewired.

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Re: diazed fuses [Re: Texas_Ranger] #220455 01/18/20 02:51 PM
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 114
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dsk Offline
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Originally Posted by Texas_Ranger
Typical ways of bypassing Diazed fuses are wire (individual strands) wrapped around the ceramic body or a nail driven through the metal end caps and ceramic body. The worst kind is usually found in metal shops with a lathe, a solid metal bottle "fuse".

I've been guilty of "repairing" a 20 amp fuse myself, although I knew it only fed a single motor with additional protection of a 25 amp MCB upstream. The MCB was the actual protection for the old motor, the fuse was only necessary to avoid changing the historic wiring (ca.-1920) for a quick test run. Doing that I discovered that a single strand from a 1,5 mm2 conductor probably takes around 16 amps, maybe a bit less - it blew within less than a minute. A second strand fixed that issue. The next time we ran the motor we fitted a proper fuse of course.


I have learned that a 1.5 mm^2 rubber cable has 27 strands, and one is pretty equal to 5 amp fuse wire, the 2 is a little less than 10, 3 strands around 13 Amps. Never tested that on a diazed fuse, but on 12V systems, learned this when I asked about the UK rewindable fuse system my teacher told me this 35 years ago.

dsk

Re: diazed fuses [Re: annemarie1] #220456 01/18/20 06:10 PM
Joined: Dec 2002
Posts: 1,250
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djk Offline
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@Texas_Ranger : I was referring to a video further back up the thread with the ludicrously dangerous electrical 'stunts'. They were connecting wires as a resistance directly to an unfused mains supply at a meter etc.. Really insane stuff. If you've seen the rest of their videos, you'd wonder how they even are still around and they're certainly likely to be risking things like eye injury from UV from arcs and even microwave exposure from removing magnetrons from microwave ovens - high risk of cataracts and so on, if not serious burns.


Last edited by djk; 01/18/20 06:13 PM.
Re: diazed fuses [Re: djk] #220467 01/23/20 07:10 PM
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 2,485
T
Texas_Ranger Offline
Member
Originally Posted by djk
@Texas_Ranger : I was referring to a video further back up the thread with the ludicrously dangerous electrical 'stunts'. They were connecting wires as a resistance directly to an unfused mains supply at a meter etc.. Really insane stuff. If you've seen the rest of their videos, you'd wonder how they even are still around and they're certainly likely to be risking things like eye injury from UV from arcs and even microwave exposure from removing magnetrons from microwave ovens - high risk of cataracts and so on, if not serious burns.



Ah, I think you're talking about these two chaps!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ugxq0FMjoQ

Re: diazed fuses [Re: djk] #220473 01/26/20 05:34 AM
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 114
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dsk Offline
Member
Originally Posted by djk
@Texas_Ranger : I was referring to a video further back up the thread with the ludicrously dangerous electrical 'stunts'. They were connecting wires as a resistance directly to an unfused mains supply at a meter etc.. Really insane stuff. If you've seen the rest of their videos, you'd wonder how they even are still around and they're certainly likely to be risking things like eye injury from UV from arcs and even microwave exposure from removing magnetrons from microwave ovens - high risk of cataracts and so on, if not serious burns.



When I was at highschool the GFCI's was introduced, and we could get extension cords with one. I asked a teacher on th Electro line (Education of electricians) if should buy one, and he replied:
T: Have you got electric shock?
Me: Yes
T: Did you get hurt?
Me: No!
T: Then you cope with it!

I bought one thumbs

dsk

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