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#218032 - 01/19/17 05:25 AM Safety at heights?
Trumpy Offline


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Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8211
Loc: SI,New Zealand
Folks,
I do a lot of work in my normal job that makes me work at heights, this could be anything from 3 metres (9') off the ground, up to 12 metres (36').
Just a question for you folks, if you guys have to do this sort of thing, how do you approach this?
Obviously there will be a harness, a safety line and some sort of lanyard/ fall arrest unit.
I'm not intrinsically sure what OSHA say about this sort of thing in the US, but I do know here, the person who is expected to do the work needs to have a work plan and a rescue plan, in case something goes wrong.
The floor is open for comments.................
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#218037 - 01/19/17 07:16 PM Re: Safety at heights? [Re: Trumpy]
gfretwell Offline


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Registered: 07/20/04
Posts: 9039
Loc: Estero,Fl,usa
In Florida there are lots of rules, not a lot of compliance.
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#218045 - 01/20/17 09:13 PM Re: Safety at heights? [Re: gfretwell]
Trumpy Offline


Member
Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8211
Loc: SI,New Zealand
Greg,
That worries me somewhat, because there aren't a lot of accidents at work that will injure you as badly as a fall from height, especially if you fall on your head.

I've done a lot of lines rescue stuff with the NZ fire service here when people get themselves into trouble in various places, but it's sort of like when people are at work, they use the cheapest available harnesses and never get them inspected, so things wear out and when someone does have a fall, the harness breaks it's stitching.

The old "she'll be right" attitude really needs to be turned around.
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Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin
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#218051 - 01/21/17 02:19 AM Re: Safety at heights? [Re: Trumpy]
gfretwell Offline


Member
Registered: 07/20/04
Posts: 9039
Loc: Estero,Fl,usa
This all comes down to who the job super is and how well they monitor their sites. It is usually the one shot jobs like replacing an existing roof or tree trimming where I see the worst violations. I have never seen a roofer tied off and I see tree trimmers free climbing with a chain saw. In our (USA) litigious environment, the homeowner better be very sure his trades are licensed and insured.
That said, I still see guys on big projects who are not following proper procedures more often than I should.
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#218055 - 01/21/17 08:51 PM Re: Safety at heights? [Re: Trumpy]
HotLine1 Offline


Member
Registered: 04/03/02
Posts: 6778
Loc: Brick, NJ USA
Trumpy:

As Greg said,it's dependent on the jobsite here also. (NJ)

Lately, OSHA has generated a lot of publicity and large fines, mostly for unsafe excavations/trenching. A few days ago, $78,500 to one sewer contractor, no shoring, and lack of safety equipment (retrieval gear). No doubt the fine will be appealed, and a settlement with no liability will be the usual outcome.

I expect to see them whenever there is any type of incident that results in damages or injuries.

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#218129 - 01/30/17 03:55 AM Re: Safety at heights? [Re: gfretwell]
Trumpy Offline


Member
Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8211
Loc: SI,New Zealand
Greg,
I fully understand what you're saying, I mean, everyone wants to go home in the same state they came to work, with all their fingers, arms, legs and stuff like that.
But every now and then there will be a crew of guys that will do the job so much cheaper, no safety gear or an observer (especially trimming trees around live 22kV lines), a branch fell over two phases. and the guy tried to pull the branch off as it was burning, with his bare hand, he died on the spot, after the current went through his shoes.
Why is this stuff so difficult to get into people's heads?
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Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin
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#218148 - 01/30/17 11:03 PM Re: Safety at heights? [Re: Trumpy]
gfretwell Offline


Member
Registered: 07/20/04
Posts: 9039
Loc: Estero,Fl,usa
A lot of our workers come from south of the border where safety is an afterthought and they bring that culture with them. It is hard to get them with the program and unfortunately there were plenty of anglo managers who just think "there are more where he came from". The attitude is turning but there is nothing like an OSHA "go team" who show up after an accident to mold there opinion. Once they are in town, they hit as many jobs as they can before they move on to the next accident.
Usually they get pretty good compliance with hard hats and footwear. Other PPE and fall protection seems to be a little less prevalent. I still see guys walking the beam with a concrete hose fairly regularly. The best the super can do is be sure the ground around the wall is policed up so they won't land on broken block and rebar if they fall. Nobody wants to set up 150-200 feet of scaffolding to pump a truckload or two of concrete.
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Greg Fretwell
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