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#56315 - 09/19/05 02:34 PM Actual tool or trade name?  
wv-wire-wrangler  Offline
Member
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 26
Morgantown, WV
I figured out how to do a forum search and searched tools.

One tool was mentioned a couple times that I've never heard of.

What is an electricians Hammer?????

Is it a real tool and what does it differ from a regular one?

Sam


Samuel A Mercure

Work Gear for Electricians and the Trades

#56316 - 09/19/05 02:51 PM Re: Actual tool or trade name?  
NJwirenut  Offline
Member
Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 806
Bergen County, NJ
I've heard lineman's pliers jokingly referred to as an "electrician's hammer", as they are occasionally seen being used as one (tightening locknuts, knocking a hole through sheetrock, etc.). [Linked Image]

A real "electrician's hammer" has the striking face on an elongated stalk, to allow you to drive nails inside an electrical box to secure the box to framing members. It also has a straight claw, to allow you to pull a nail inside a box.
http://www.goodmart.com/products/85575.htm


#56317 - 09/19/05 02:52 PM Re: Actual tool or trade name?  
Creighton  Offline
Member
Joined: Jan 2002
Posts: 59
Hayward, CA
In my day an electrician's hammer had a straight claw, as opposed to the curved claw on a carpenter's hammer. The straight claw was handy for finding boxes the platerers had covered up. If there were a few extra holes, that was their problem.
Creighton


#56318 - 09/19/05 02:52 PM Re: Actual tool or trade name?  
iwire  Offline
Moderator
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,391
North Attleboro, MA USA
Hi Sam, yes it is real.

[Linked Image]

The difference is a long head so it can reach to the back of a box that you are nailing.

Here is some opinion.

Don't bother, get a stubby head and claw.

No one I know nails boxes through the back that the long head would help, but when you work between joists putting in staples the long head and claw are a major pain.

Bob


Bob Badger
Construction & Maintenance Electrician
Massachusetts

#56319 - 09/19/05 02:56 PM Re: Actual tool or trade name?  
iwire  Offline
Moderator
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,391
North Attleboro, MA USA
Wow, we are all over that. [Linked Image]


Bob Badger
Construction & Maintenance Electrician
Massachusetts

#56320 - 09/19/05 03:58 PM Re: Actual tool or trade name?  
wv-wire-wrangler  Offline
Member
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 26
Morgantown, WV
Thanks guys, that was a fast answer!

Neat tool!!

I had another question about a tool that I just thought of, do I post it here or start a new topic?

Thanks again,
Sam


Samuel A Mercure

#56321 - 09/19/05 04:03 PM Re: Actual tool or trade name?  
iwire  Offline
Moderator
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,391
North Attleboro, MA USA
New topics are cheap, start a new one with a descriptive title. [Linked Image]


Bob Badger
Construction & Maintenance Electrician
Massachusetts

#56322 - 09/19/05 04:07 PM Re: Actual tool or trade name?  
wv-wire-wrangler  Offline
Member
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 26
Morgantown, WV
Thanks guys, that was a fast answer!

Neat tool!!

I had another question about a tool that I just thought of, do I post it here or start a new topic?

Thanks again,
Sam


Samuel A Mercure

#56323 - 09/19/05 09:31 PM Re: Actual tool or trade name?  
trollog  Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 276
San Diego California USA
Well, I dunno.. I have thought of getting one of those hammers (we call them "aardvarks" or "anteaters") for nailing slammers (aka concrete expansion anchors) into 4-square boxes. Seems like a longer snout would have less abuse inflicted on the handle area where it enters the metal head of the hammer, by metal boxes, but to tell you the truth I never have broken down and spent the cash on one, so let actions speak louder than words I guess- I still use my garden-variety vaughn "california framer" hammer, mainly because it has a waffle face which tends to not slide off the thing you are striking. If klein made a waffle-faced aarvark, I would probably buy it tomorrow.


#56324 - 09/20/05 07:07 PM Re: Actual tool or trade name?  
Cow  Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 33
Hermiston, OR
I use a regular Craftsman framing hammer as well for driving lead anchors through 4 sq. boxes. Head is long enough the handle never touches the side of the box. Another tip that works well is to take a short piece of rebar or steel rod about 10 inches long and drill a divet in the end with a quarter inch bit. The rebar never slips off making driving lead anchors a dream.

[This message has been edited by Cow (edited 09-20-2005).]

[This message has been edited by Cow (edited 09-20-2005).]


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