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#26395 - 06/10/03 10:44 PM How do you warranty your work?  
Bill Addiss  Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 3,878
NY, USA
Just curious how everyone warrantys their work they do, specifically the parts involved.

For example, a Timeclock, or Attic Fan you installed at the end of last season doesn't work this year. Customer is looking at you to fix or replace it, how do you handle it?

How about Electronics, Low Voltage switching modules, motion detectors, etc that may be sensative to voltage spikes, Lightning storms etc?

Bill


Work Gear for Electricians and the Trades

#26396 - 06/11/03 06:36 AM Re: How do you warranty your work?  
walrus  Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 680
Bangor Me. USA
I warranty electronics all the time. If the company stands behind their parts then so do I but its the part not my labor. Where I don't deal with homeowners its not a big deal. If the part failed within hours and or a few days then I generally eat the labor but it depends on whether or not I have to keep the peace [Linked Image]
I can't imagine its that easy dealing with homeowners though [Linked Image]


#26397 - 06/11/03 07:16 AM Re: How do you warranty your work?  
sparky  Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,311
I deal with this issue by having the homeowners obtain thier own fixtures.

In the residential arena, the markup vs. the agravation makes this a standard for me.

If i am requested to purchase (for instance) a motion detector i will inform them they are getting a high end ( usually $80 and up) model w/warranty that they sign/mail in.

If a customer is in a high lightning area, i will point out the sensitive switching, or other electronics that i will buy/install may require some level of protection.

Past that, my policy is simply to wire everything bomb proof


#26398 - 06/11/03 07:56 AM Re: How do you warranty your work?  
iwire  Offline
Moderator
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,391
North Attleboro, MA USA
We do parts and labor for one year, excluding lamps.

I believe this is a MA state requirement but I am not sure on that.

We do not do residential work, what gets interesting is some large retail chains supply the distribution and lighting equipment for there projects but we still have to do the warranty work on these items for free. This is by contract not the law.

So when they buy the cheapest lighting they can find we know we will be back changing ballasts many times during the year.

We can either buy the ballasts ourselves or chase the manufactures.


Bob Badger
Construction & Maintenance Electrician
Massachusetts

#26399 - 06/11/03 08:59 AM Re: How do you warranty your work?  
Bill Addiss  Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 3,878
NY, USA
Quote
I can't imagine its that easy dealing with homeowners though
walrus,

You can say that again! I think your approach is fair and justified, but it doesn't usually go over so well with the residential and small business customers.

Bill


#26400 - 06/11/03 09:30 AM Re: How do you warranty your work?  
Bill Addiss  Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 3,878
NY, USA
Sparky,

I've been inclined to go with your method of letting them pick out their own stuff as much as practical, but I'm sure that you can agree that doesn't always work out either.

If you are asked to supply things like Electronic switches, motion detectors, etc, and they later go bad, say under 1 year, do you replace for FREE?


#26401 - 06/11/03 10:59 AM Re: How do you warranty your work?  
HotLine1  Offline


Member
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,853
Brick, NJ USA
Bill:
Had to jump in here.....
The "good/regular" clients (comm) get a 1 year, no questions asked warranty. THe mfg usually stands behind there products, if you "buy" the better grade items. The 1 year does exclude lamps/bulbs unless covered by the mfg.

We do a lot of site lighting, and on new installs with one brand, here is there warranty policy:
Fixture/pole finish; seven (7) years
Fixture components; three (3) years
BULBS, one (1) year.

I have to say that we ahve had very, very few "call-backs", even with that ^ warranty. BTW, they pay for materials; RGA basis thru the factory, and may consider renumeration for labor in some circumstances.

John


John

#26402 - 06/11/03 11:59 PM Re: How do you warranty your work?  
sparky  Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,311
Quote
but I'm sure that you can agree that doesn't always work out either.

True, no one format is universal

Quote
If you are asked to supply things like Electronic switches, motion detectors, etc, and they later go bad, say under 1 year, do you replace for FREE?


yes, if in face the product, not the usage, is bad...


#26403 - 06/12/03 06:32 AM Re: How do you warranty your work?  
Electricmanscott  Offline
Member
Joined: Jan 2002
Posts: 1,457
Holden, MA USA
I insist I buy everything except surface mount light fixtures. Everything I buy, lots of dimmers, undercabinet lights and such, one year warranty. My supplier takes these returns without a hassle. Labor I eat and don't worry about it. If the problem is with something they buy they are billed for my time. I feel part of marking up products you sell is to cover yourself in this situatiion.


#26404 - 06/12/03 08:18 AM Re: How do you warranty your work?  
PCBelarge  Offline
Member
Joined: Jun 2003
Posts: 681
Dobbs Ferry, NY, USA
Experience in this arena is the best teacher.
When I first started contracting, I would give the house away, a great way to build the business, but no way to make money. Always running,
Now I have learned the 'good customers' residential or commercial will pay for good work, reliable work, and someone who answers the phone. Also most people do not value free work and than they expect it. What I tell them is two of my favorite lines.
1. When they ask for volume discounts -
"when you go to the grocercy store do you ask for a discount on the milk you buy?"
2. If they ask 'what can you do with the price?' Lets say the quote was $ 32,500.00
"make it $35,000.00"
This lets them know that I do not bargain. The general public today has been trained (brainwashed) to always try to get a bargain.
As my business grew I learned (mostly the hard way) to weed out the ones who did not want to pay. Time and experience will show you what works for you.

School of hard knocks,

Pierre

P.S. If we had these forums when I started, it probably would have been easier.


Pierre Belarge

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