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#193523 - 04/06/10 03:27 PM Ontario Code Clarification  
mr_electrician  Offline
Member
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 106
London, Ontario
I have a couple questions that I need clarification on and have to do with residential renovation work.

Are we allowed to use an existing 3 wire from an old split circuit and use one of the hots for the fridge circuit and the other for an over the range, therfore sharing the neutral and leaving the 2 pole breaker in?

Would having junction boxes behind where a fridge is going to go make it an inaccesible junction box violation. Since the fridge can be moved I would figure it would be considered accesible.

I can't find anything in the code that says we can't for either question asked. If it is a code violation could you refer me to the code rule?
Thanks


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#193525 - 04/06/10 06:19 PM Re: Ontario Code Clarification [Re: mr_electrician]  
mikesh  Offline
Member
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 613
Victoria, BC, Canada
A couple of things come to mind and this is a BC perspective but should mostly be consistent with all provinces.
The three wire circuit you describe can be fed with 2 - 1 pole breakers that of course must be placed on opposite poles to ensure the neutral current does not double.

Second and probably more to your question. It depends. Many hood fans are not wired to a jb behind the fan but to the jb forming part of the fan. If the equipment JB allows for a 3 wire in and a 2 wire out then you can do the connection in the hood fan JB. If you install a JB behind the hood fan you might be violating the accessible part in some jurisdictions depending on whether each inspection authority looks as that as accessible. The fridge outlet is likely going to be interpreted as accessible as would a range plug or dryer outlet.

From My answer the most compliant wiring path would be panel to fridge plug with 3 wire and fridge plug to hood fan with a 2 wire. 2 single pole breakers located on adjacent bus. A 2 pole breaker would not be a violation but this is not a single device with a shared neutral like a split receptacle which does require a 2 pole breaker or a tie bar across 2 single pole breakers.


#193530 - 04/06/10 09:28 PM Re: Ontario Code Clarification [Re: mikesh]  
twh  Offline
Member
Joined: Mar 2004
Posts: 918
Regina, Sask.
The jb behind the fridge is as accessible as the receptacle behind the fridge.

If the "over the range" is a microwave, two single breakers are okay. If it's a hard-wired range hood, it brings to question 14-010(b). That rule has been applied so strictly at times that if the multi-wire branch circuit feeds lights AND plugs, a two-pole breaker is required. The actual rule contains an exception for fixed lighting loads OR non-split receptacles.


#193570 - 04/08/10 11:37 AM Re: Ontario Code Clarification [Re: twh]  
mr_electrician  Offline
Member
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 106
London, Ontario
Thanks for the clarification!! I figured it was ok but wanted to be sure. I tend to over complicate simple code rules and therefore confuse myself!!! Better to ask though.


Never trust an electrician with no eyebrows!!

#193702 - 04/14/10 12:34 PM Re: Ontario Code Clarification [Re: mr_electrician]  
smarty12  Offline
New Member
Joined: Apr 2010
Posts: 1
UK
Really it been learning .. from the first min when I was here in this forum..!! Any separate unit with its own cooking, eating, sleeping, and sanitary facilities in a detached or semi-detached house or a rowhouse is classified as an "accessory dwelling unit." It doesn't matter whether it's a basement apartment for rent or a unit to accommodate a family member or a nanny.

Isnt it..??

.
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#193703 - 04/14/10 07:47 PM Re: Ontario Code Clarification [Re: smarty12]  
mikesh  Offline
Member
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 613
Victoria, BC, Canada
Originally Posted by smarty12
Really it been learning .. from the first min when I was here in this forum..!! Any separate unit with its own cooking, eating, sleeping, and sanitary facilities in a detached or semi-detached house or a rowhouse is classified as an "accessory dwelling unit." It doesn't matter whether it's a basement apartment for rent or a unit to accommodate a family member or a nanny.

Smarty12
Your question does not seem related to the topic? If you are asking about a suite in a house there are seperate rules in the Building code for secondary suites.
Rules for receptacles are divided into 3 parts. All receptacles, receptacles in residential occupancies and receptacles in dwelling units. A Dwelling unit must have eating, sleeping and cooking facilities. Could be a room in a motel or hotel but with out the cooking facilities only a residential rule would apply.

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