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#135210 - 12/27/02 01:11 PM Proposed standards> Lighting plugs.  
classicsat  Offline
Member
Joined: Nov 2002
Posts: 456
Another one to consider (in addition to general purpose power and telephone),
is electrical fittings specific to lighting
devices. In my mind, I am thinking a two
pin polarised connector (one pin bigger than
the other), shrouded to protect the pins.
The wall receptacle would have the likes of
a 3A fuse or CB, recessed, the females on
lighting extensions or lighting strings would be shrouded. Also available would be a device to fit into a GP power fitting, which
would have a fuse/CB and a switch.


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#135211 - 12/27/02 05:58 PM Re: Proposed standards> Lighting plugs.  
lyledunn  Offline
Member
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 159
N.Ireland
Classicat

What do you mean by polarised connector?

What I would really like to see is more use of existing technology in the form of "Klik" units. There is still far too much use made of pvc connectors to make the final connection of luminaire to fixed wiring.


regards

lyle dunn

#135212 - 12/27/02 06:54 PM Re: Proposed standards> Lighting plugs.  
pauluk  Offline
Member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,520
Norfolk, England
Quote
What do you mean by polarised connector?

Non-reversible, so that line and neutral can be connected only one way round.

This sounds like an interesting idea, although to satisfy the requirements of most national codes these days any such wall-receptacle would probably need to include an earth/ground connection as well.

Britain used to use small 2A connectors specifically for lighting loads years ago, although the non-grounding (2-prong) types were unpolarized.


#135213 - 12/27/02 08:11 PM Re: Proposed standards> Lighting plugs.  
David UK  Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 2002
Posts: 134
Inverness, Scotland
In the UK we already have a dedicated lighting connector, more correctly called a luminaire support coupler. The most commonly used version is known as the "Klik socket", rated @ 6A 250V and used in commercial/industrial installations for final connection of luminaires.
To see a picture of this device go to: www.hager.co.uk and clik on the orange KLIK logo.

[This message has been edited by David UK (edited 12-27-2002).]


#135214 - 12/28/02 02:08 PM Re: Proposed standards> Lighting plugs.  
lyledunn  Offline
Member
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 159
N.Ireland
Paul,
Sorry to pursue this but give me an example of something that has "polarised" connectors


regards

lyle dunn

#135215 - 12/28/02 05:29 PM Re: Proposed standards> Lighting plugs.  
Hutch  Offline
Member
Joined: May 2002
Posts: 381
South Oxfordshire, UK
Lyledunn,

The polarisation debate has been dealt with quite a bit on this thread:

https://www.electrical-contractor.net/ubb/Forum9/HTML/000167.html

A good example of a polarised socket which can only receive a polarised plug is the Australian/New Zealand example below.

[Linked Image]

Like its American counterpart, it does not need an earthed (3 pin) plug to access the slots - the top two in the above example are live and neutral. You can see by their configuration that a 2 pin plug can only fit in one way up. i.e. it is polarised without reference to an earth pin. Two round (or square/oblong) pins/holes cannot achieve this.


#135216 - 12/28/02 08:37 PM Re: Proposed standards> Lighting plugs.  
Trumpy  Offline


Member
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,217
SI,New Zealand
David,
I know exactly what you mean, with the "Klik"-type fitting, we use them all the time, over here in factories.
We also use the older variation of these, the Pluglit fitting, which is essentially the same thing, but it uses a 3pin polarised plug.
These fittings make life a helluva lot easier
if you have to remove a light fitting, that is up high, to repair it, you just unplug it,
nothing could be easier. [Linked Image]


Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

#135217 - 12/29/02 09:44 AM Re: Proposed standards> Lighting plugs.  
pauluk  Offline
Member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,520
Norfolk, England
Lyle,
All 3-pin British Standard plugs are polarized, whether BS1363 or BS546. French grounding-type plugs are also polarized, whereas the more common European Shuko and the two-prong flat "Euro" plugs are not.

I've seen various types of "ceiling rose" plugs, and they certainly make installing pendant sets easier, although you're still left with working above your head for the wiring into the outlet.


#135218 - 12/29/02 02:55 PM Re: Proposed standards> Lighting plugs.  
lyledunn  Offline
Member
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 159
N.Ireland
Paul,

Yep, see what you mean. To be honest I may be a little pedantic in inferring that the use of the word "polarized" is inappropriate for what you are talking about with reference to the strict definition of the term within electrical engineering.


regards

lyle dunn


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