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#130999 - 06/24/02 08:04 AM Server  
Frank Cinker  Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 311
Pennsylvania
Could someone give me a "generic" definition of a server. The more simple the better.
Thank you.
Frank


Tools for Electricians:

#131000 - 06/24/02 11:05 AM Re: Server  
Joe Tedesco  Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 2,749
Boston, Massachusetts USA


Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

#131001 - 06/24/02 11:50 AM Re: Server  
Frank Cinker  Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 311
Pennsylvania
Thank you Joe.


#131002 - 06/29/02 02:31 AM Re: Server  
Scott35  Offline

Broom Pusher and
Member
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 2,707
Anaheim, CA. USA
Frank,

Not sure what info was available from the link given, or if it has the same info as I am including here, so I'll toss in some quick-ees:

LAN / WAN Tech 101 [Linked Image]... Please take notes as there will be a quiz at the end of the discussion!

Term - Server [simplified / general meaning]:
Any Networked Computer that provides some type of service to other Computers on the Network.

Types of Servers:

<OL TYPE=A>

[*]Disk Servers: Primarily a file storage device. File Serving first began with the Disk Server approach. This can also cover Networks using Dumb Terminal type nodes.
Downside of this type of Server is that each node (workstation on the network) maps the FAT of the server's fixed disk drive (Hard Drive) at the time of Boot-up, so when the FAT gets changed by normal file use, no one can tell what the disk drive looks like without a reboot.


[*]File Server:
Instead of sharing the "Physical" disk to the Network, a file server shares the Storage Area. It works kind of like disk serving, but instead of each client seeing the server's entire drive (and FAT), the drive is partitioned and each client maps a drive letter (or Unicode path) on the shared volume, which appears like another fixed disk - local to the client machine. This "fixes" a FAT to the drive letter, so each partition on the server's drive is like a separate drive on the client machine(s). When it (the FAT) changes, it's due to the file work done by that particular client - hence it's automatically kept current.


[*]Print Servers:
Print Servers are either a regular, run-of-the-mill type Computer with (some) CPU power, or simple stand-alone print server devices. For the "PC" type server, a nice 80486 DX2 will work fine for Print Serving.
This concept allows multiple clients to print to one shared printer. This also can allow multiple printers to be shared by clients.
Print jobs are "Spooled" to the print server, which frees up the client's machine from printing tasks.


[*]Communication Servers:
Simply, these servers are MODEM Pooling and Proxy servers. All clients share MODEMS connected to the Comm Server for Communications type service, such as Faxing (In and Out), WAN applications, Internet work and Internet + WAN type E-Mail.
Can be used with common Analog services (MODEMs), or use Leased Lines (such as ISDN, T1,2,3 and such), or with a certain flavor of DSL (ADSL, SDSL, HDSL, etc.).


[*]Application Servers:
As the name applies, instead of each client holding the working copy of the Application, the Application Server holds the Application and each client gets a "Copy" of the App' when the client "requests" one. (Applications are the programs you use to do Corn-Puter / Nerd work, such as Excel, Lotus 1-2-3, Word, Adobe Acrobat, Netscape, AutoCAD, etc.)
This keeps the App' from becoming corrupted, plus helps keep the most recent and less buggy version for use.
One of the simpler reasons for this has to do with Security (mostly in the form of theft and piracy protection).
This method requires the Company's Net Geek (Network Administrator) to setup clients with "Instances" and all that junk for all LAN work. This also requires a net geek to be in the "Nerd Room" (Administration Room) at all times to monitor network usage (I am very green with App' server tech, so correct me if I am wrong with the monitor protocol!)
</OL>

Peer-To-Peer networks may or maynot have a dedicated file server machine, as each machine is just the same as any other one. Client Server networking does not automatically dictate one certain machine as a "Dedicated Server" - all machines are treated equal. Setting up instances and stuff like that just limits the ability for clients to access shared resources.

Hope I have given you some helpful basics as to "Whaddaheck Is A Server, Anyway???" I have covered this a lot, and it gets a little easier to explain each time, so if the above info does not come across very clear, just wait for me to discuss it a few more times and the stuff should clear up a lot more [Linked Image]

Scott S.E.T.


Scott " 35 " Thompson
Just Say NO To Green Eggs And Ham!

#131003 - 06/30/02 10:02 AM Re: Server  
Frank Cinker  Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 311
Pennsylvania
Scott-

Thanks for the simple, basic, generic definition: "Term - Server [simplified / general meaning]:
Any Networked Computer that provides some type of service to other Computers on the Network".

A server is only in conjunction with two or more computers, correct?

Let me ask you another question. I have two Windows 2000 personal computers in my house on two separate Telephone Company lines. If I wanted to "network" between the two computers I would need a server, correct?

Thanks for your patience Scott. I know these are very basic questions.

Frank Cinker


#131004 - 06/30/02 07:53 PM Re: Server  
Scott35  Offline

Broom Pusher and
Member
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 2,707
Anaheim, CA. USA
Frank,

Glad I could assist you!

Regarding the First Q':
[QUOTE]
A server is only in conjunction with two or more computers, correct?
[QUOTE]
Basically, this is true for any network topology. A server would be a "Common Machine" or other type of device between one machine and another.
Examples:
An Internet Server [such as your ISP's Server] links your machine to the 1,024,000,000 [+/-] other machines and servers which make up the WWW.
Another example would be a print server which connects a single printer to two work stations [machines]. The print server may or may not be a PC type machine - it may be a simple stand-alone item.

Regarding the second Q':
[QUOTE]
Let me ask you another question. I have two Windows 2000 personal computers in my house on two separate Telephone Company
lines. If I wanted to "network" between the two computers I would need a server, correct?
[QUOTE]
This can be done in the most simplest way possible, when it comes to a Peer-To-Peer Network.
Using Ethernet LAN, each machine gets a NIC [Network Interface Card] and only a single CAT-5 UTP cable between them is needed.
This works just the same as if there were more than two machines on the network.
Remember, with simple LANs all machines are created equal, so there is no requirement for a dedicated server machine.
Even printing can be done without the need of a print server [although if you have high volume output from both machines, consider using some type of print server]. Just share the printer[s] as you would share the hard drives and one machine can print to the other's printer - and vice verse.

When three or more machines are networked together, you will need to connect them through an Ethernet Switch [Hub]. Still the need for a dedicated server is just a matter of personal choice here and the LAN will run just fine without one.

[QUOTE]
Thanks for your patience Scott. I know these are very basic questions.
[QUOTE]
Actually they are not so basic at that! You need to know the way things get connected, which is a quite a few more steps above the point when a person has grasped the concept of just what a LAN is and what does it do. Even that is above basic!

I hope this info is helpful to you also.
Feel free to post any questions you may have regarding LAN tech.
If you feel the need to dive head first into the nerd world of Networking, I encourage you to do so!!! There are many highly detailed Tech books covering Networks, so the resources are definitely out there.
As always, you [and anyone else] are encouraged to bounce Q's here - as well as, or in supplement to, the book studies.

Good Luck!

Scott S.E.T.


Scott " 35 " Thompson
Just Say NO To Green Eggs And Ham!

#131005 - 09/05/02 05:09 PM Re: Server  
tsolanto  Offline
Member
Joined: Sep 2002
Posts: 131
Long Island NY
In general the server is the computer where all the important data is being stored. Other computers on the network (client computers) can access these files modify them and when they save changes these changes are saved to the servers hard drive instead of the on the client computer. The advantage of having a server is that all people on the network that have rights to access the files can do so.



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