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#115979 - 01/18/04 03:09 AM Daisy Chaining?  
Admin  Offline

Administrator
Member
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 3,458
NY, USA
[Linked Image]
Quote
Question: Is this permitted?

Can I daisy chain these together and are they suitable for use as extension cords?

-Anonymous
(submitted via Joe Tedesco)


Tools for Electricians:

#115980 - 01/18/04 10:59 AM Re: Daisy Chaining?  
electure  Offline


Member
Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 4,262
Fullerton, CA USA
The UL White Book lists these gizmos as "Relocatable Power Taps (XBYS)"

They are intended to plug "directly into a permanently installed branch circuit receptacle"
They are "not intended to be series connected (daisy chained) to other relocatable power taps or extension cords."
Additionally, the aren't to be permanently attached to anything (workbench, desk, etc), and can't be used on construction sites (although I sure see lots of them used on sites for battery chargers, big dumb radios, and the like).

Thanks to Joe, and ECN, we've all got easy access to this kind of info. I never would have dreamed of finding something like this in the past. Pay attention, it pays...S

[This message has been edited by electure (edited 01-18-2004).]


#115981 - 01/18/04 11:31 AM Re: Daisy Chaining?  
Ryan_J  Offline
Moderator
Joined: Aug 2003
Posts: 1,374
West Jordan, Utah, USA
I think this a very good topic.

I often run into a prediciment when doing business license inspections. People will have extension cords all over the place and I turn them down. Usually I come back and see (1) power strip installed to resolve the issue. I'm happy.

The problem is when they do what is pictured above. When the alternative is to supply additional receptacles at a cost that may not be an option to the small business owner, is this really that big of a problem?


Ryan Jackson,
Salt Lake City

#115982 - 01/18/04 12:03 PM Re: Daisy Chaining?  
NJwirenut  Offline
Member
Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 806
Bergen County, NJ
"Additionally, the aren't to be permanently attached to anything (workbench, desk, etc)"

I wonder why most of them have mounting holes on them then?


#115983 - 01/18/04 12:45 PM Re: Daisy Chaining?  
Norwester  Offline
Junior Member
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 7
Western Australia
Always a bit sad to see something like this. The things people will do to avoid coughing up the dollars for those extra outlets.
I suppose on the plus side at least some of them now have over current or thermal trips built into them..... [Linked Image]

Not sure what the regs are on them down here.

ciao


#115984 - 01/18/04 04:30 PM Re: Daisy Chaining?  
Joe Tedesco  Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 2,749
Boston, Massachusetts USA
Thanks for the kind words Scott:

Just to make it clearer concerning your remarks here is the link that will get the UL "White" Book onto you machine.

You will need Acrobat Reader:

Quote
Here is a publication that includes many of the answers to questions related to the use of electrical equipment.

I offer it for your use and review when certain product issues arise.

Keep in mind that it is revised every year, but does not change drastically only to include new materials, or revisions or even deletions of information:


Download here:
http://joetedesco.com/2003geninfo.pdf

Question: Are pump assemblies and controls for use in pumping sewage considered as hazardous (classified) locations, even on residential properties?


Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

#115985 - 01/20/04 09:48 AM Re: Daisy Chaining?  
sabrown  Offline
Member
Joined: Dec 2002
Posts: 302
Ogden, Utah, USA
Ryan,
Yes it is that big of a problem.

It seems to be wide spread with the worst I've seen being under a computer room floor where two were daisy chained into a third, this third one daisey chained with a forth one into a fifth which finally went into the wall.

Lastly, the wiring and the standard they are built to are for small amperage loads connected to each receptacle. Daisy chaining them concentrates the loading to one receptacle which is not designed for the concentrated load. The device as a whole is often protected against over current; but each receptacle is not, being considered a tap.

We have had reports of fires with these of the surge protector type when daisy chained, though I do not know the details.

Shane


#115986 - 01/22/04 04:50 PM Re: Daisy Chaining?  
Admin  Offline

Administrator
Member
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 3,458
NY, USA
Another photo, same source:

[Linked Image]


#115987 - 01/22/04 09:10 PM Re: Daisy Chaining?  
DougW  Offline
Member
Joined: Jun 2003
Posts: 1,143
North Chicago, IL
[smart aleck]Of course, the question comes up... [Linked Image]

If they plugged load strip 'A' into load strip 'B', and then plugged load strip 'B' into load strip 'A', what would the voltage drop be? [Linked Image]

[/smart aleck]


#115988 - 01/22/04 09:21 PM Re: Daisy Chaining?  
wa2ise  Offline
Member
Joined: Nov 2002
Posts: 784
Oradell NJ USA
Quote
the wiring and the standard they are built to are for small amperage loads connected to each receptacle. Daisy chaining them concentrates the loading to one receptacle which is not designed for the concentrated load. The device as a whole is often protected against over current; but each receptacle is not, being considered a tap.

Suppose someone plugs in a kilowatt space heater in one of the outlets, and nothing in the others. Its circuit breaker would allow the current, but would the individual outlet be overloaded? Essentially the strip closest to the power source in a daisy chain would see a similar effect, lots of cuurrent in one outlet, light loading on the others. I would avoid daisy chaining because of all the voltage drop losses incurred from all those outlet/plug connections. Similar to those office cubicle wiring systems with all the jumpers and sockets. We had one burn badly out years ago. The company had an electrician replace all that with a new conduit system attached to the cubicle walls.


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