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Device Removal #97621
03/08/06 08:35 PM
03/08/06 08:35 PM
S
ShockMe77  Offline OP
Member
Joined: Jun 2005
Posts: 821
Rahway, New Jersey
We had a brief discussion in my alternating current principles class last night. The instructor was convinced that all grounded conductors at a receptacle location had to be pigtailed in order to not break the grounded path. Obviously, that's the best way to do the wiring at the receptacles, but is it necessary by the NEC? I only see this rule applying to multiwire installations where breaking the neutral could do serious damage to an appliance (like a PLASMA TELEVISION) if ever broken.

Comments?

2017 / 2014 NEC & Related Books and Study Guides
Re: Device Removal #97622
03/08/06 09:15 PM
03/08/06 09:15 PM
R
resqcapt19  Offline
Member
Joined: Nov 2000
Posts: 2,148
IL
You are correct. The rule in 300.13(B) only applies to the grounded conductor of a multiwire branch circuit.
Don


Don(resqcapt19)
Re: Device Removal #97623
03/08/06 10:35 PM
03/08/06 10:35 PM
watersparkfalls  Offline
Member
Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 222
Washington...Not DC
hey shock,
how would you do it without a pigtail?
put "two" wires under one recepticle ground screw?
if so; where is the ul listing for this type of device?
we all agree that the ground is the most important conductor and a pig tail would be the only way.

h20

Re: Device Removal #97624
03/08/06 10:43 PM
03/08/06 10:43 PM
T
Tiger  Offline
Member
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 706
Crystal Lake, IL USA
The grounded conductor is the white/neutral

Dave

Re: Device Removal #97625
03/09/06 03:53 AM
03/09/06 03:53 AM
watersparkfalls  Offline
Member
Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 222
Washington...Not DC
opps "ed" not "ing"
my mistake....
then i agree, no pigtail required by nec.
not sure about damage to equipment since the "grounding" would still be there.
on a multiwire you open neut at homerun and you put 240 across the circuits and this is never good. although power tools run really fast for a little while yuk yuk.

h20

Re: Device Removal #97626
03/13/06 04:30 AM
03/13/06 04:30 AM
T
tmegger64  Offline
Junior Member
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 7
Naples Fl.
Good Morning

What about 250.148(B)?

Tom

Re: Device Removal #97627
03/13/06 04:33 AM
03/13/06 04:33 AM
T
tmegger64  Offline
Junior Member
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 7
Naples Fl.
opps same thing with grounded and grounding, got to wake up this am sorry

Tom

Re: Device Removal #97628
03/13/06 09:04 AM
03/13/06 09:04 AM
L
Larry Fine  Offline
Member
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 693
Richmond, VA
The reason a device-dependent neutral path matters on multi-wire circuits is that, when handle-tied breakers are not used, one circuit can be deenergized to be worked on, but another sharing the same neutral can still be hot, making the load side of an opened neutral connection hot.


Larry Fine
Fine Electric Co.
fineelectricco.com
Re: Device Removal #97629
03/14/06 08:42 AM
03/14/06 08:42 AM
S
ShockMe77  Offline OP
Member
Joined: Jun 2005
Posts: 821
Rahway, New Jersey
Larry, and isn't it true that if the grounded splice comes apart, one leg of the multiwire branch circuit will carry a higher voltage than the other ungrounded conductor? I seem to recall seeing/ reading this in one of my trade books somewhere. Could you explain why this happens?

Re: Device Removal #97630
03/14/06 09:15 AM
03/14/06 09:15 AM
G
George Little  Offline
Member
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,489
Michigan USA
At the risk of insulting everyone's intelligence on this forum I explain it this way- If you have a multi-wire branch circuit consisting of two ungrounded conductors and one grounded conductor, the loads of each of the ungrounded conductors are using the single grounded conductor for a return to the transformer. Should the grounded conductor be interrupted and the is no return to the transformer via the grounded conductor then the return path is through the other ungrounded conductor and any load on that other ungrounded conductor path, This could and probably would create a problem if the total current flow exceeded the limit of one of the components in this new found path back to the transformer. Example a 10a. load on one ungrounded conductor and a 1a. load on the other conductor now become a total load of 11a. and the 1a. load (100w. bulb for instance) would not tolerate the flow of 11a. and the bulb would burn out.


George Little
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