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Joined: Oct 2003
Posts: 9
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resqcapt
Thank you for clarification on this breaker issue as it pertains to 110.3(B)

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Joined: Jan 2003
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Back to outlets ground up or down.

[Linked Image from fineartlight.com]

Leviton Clock outlet.

No personal choice here, ground down or the clock is on the floor. [Linked Image]

Has anyone seen a clock that needed a grounding outlet? [Linked Image]

Bob


Bob Badger
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Bob

When I got too old to be spanked, my parents would ground me.
That would have been a good time to see the clock grounded [Linked Image].

Pierre


Pierre Belarge
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No - can't say as I have iwire, but I believe all recept. are required to have the ground.

I was wondering if that was the point of the first post.

This will be argued until the end of time. I would say that since these are refered to as U-ground recept. that the ground by configuration terminology is intended to be down.

I always install with ground down. I think it looks best.

The monkey-wrench I like to throw in the argument is:
When installing horizontally - Should the ground be on the left or right?

Now everyone be sure and answer left...lol

Joined: Jan 2003
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I believe you can still get non-grounding outlets for use as replacements to existing outlets where no ground exists.

The opening post was to point out that grounds should always be installed up.

The company I work for has a ground or neutral up policy that I am happy to comply with, I just do not want to see a code rule for this.

Quote
I would say that since these are refered to as U-ground recept. that the ground by configuration terminology is intended to be down.

U Ground is referring to the shape of the ground pin and slot.

Going by this the grounds should be up.

Look at the ground slot in the clock outlet above, the "U" is upside down. [Linked Image]

You are 100% right it will be augured till the end of time. [Linked Image]

My vote goes for personal choice by the customers paying us to do the work. [Linked Image]



[This message has been edited by iwire (edited 10-29-2003).]


Bob Badger
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ouch...you got me there iwire...lol

I agree that customer preference is the key during installation. I also do not advocate a NEC ruling.

Looking at the subject from a cord end perspective, most appliances come with a cord that has a molded cap. The molded caps, that have the grounding prong, would not look or function very well with a ground-up installation.

Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 4,291
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Clock outlet?
[Linked Image]
I found this monstrosity mounted at +12" AFF in an office.
Iwire> "...or the clock is on the floor."
Well, there you go, this way, they can just lay the clock on the floor to begin with? [Linked Image]...S
BTW, 90° appliance cords are available with the ground pin mounted either direction.



[This message has been edited by electure (edited 10-31-2003).]

Joined: Aug 2003
Posts: 99
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Not to deviate from the first post, but what about dryer, and range plugs? My landlord has a 2 pole 3 wire plug, and the plug's ground is up. If the outlet is positioned with the ground down, then the plug will not hang down properly.

Joined: Sep 2003
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Regarding clock outlets:
You could use them where they are needed for other appliances. Sometimes you can't have the cord hanging down. I cant think of any examples now, but has anyone used one for any purpose besides clocks?

Electure- where's the hook? [Linked Image]

edited because I didn't make my question clear.



[This message has been edited by sparked (edited 10-31-2003).]

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Not wanting to deviate from the subject too much, but I notice in that last photo that the hot wire running to the outlet is blue.

Where 3-ph is run in conduits in a typical commercial building, it is usual to maintain phase identification in this way, even on single-phase 120V branch ciruits?

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