ECN Electrical Forum - Discussion Forums for Electricians, Inspectors and Related Professionals
ECN Shout Chat
ShoutChat
Recent Posts
240V only in a home and NEC?
by emolatur - 05/18/24 06:12 PM
Electricians revenge
by gfretwell - 05/09/24 08:24 PM
Safety at heights?
by gfretwell - 04/23/24 03:03 PM
Old low volt E10 sockets - supplier or alternative
by gfretwell - 04/21/24 11:20 AM
New in the Gallery:
This is a new one
This is a new one
by timmp, September 24
Few pics I found
Few pics I found
by timmp, August 15
Who's Online Now
1 members (Scott35), 51 guests, and 12 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Rate Thread
#80087 02/25/02 09:12 PM
Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 4,294
Member
I've got a beef with these TVSS strips.

Everyone seems to be in denial that they are an extension cord. The Fire Authorities will write up a decal missing above an extinguisher. The plan check folks will allow 1 duplex recp in an office area (of course, they have to).
I've seen these things ganged end to end through office cubicles...1 after another. I think most of us have (FD doesn't write it up because it goes "through a grommet")
What gives?
If I tell the IT guy, or the office supervisor, it makes me an A**hole 'cause the "Fire Dept says it's OK"
The strips come with little lugs (and screws)so you can screw them to the wall, cubicle, ceiling, floor,(permanent wiring) your earlobe along with 56 earrings, etc.
I don't see anything in the Code that allows the use of these.
Ty-wrap it to the wall, screw it to the wall, it all seems OK by the inspectors.

If it looks like a duck, and quacks, my first (and lasting) impression is that it's a duck [Linked Image]
It's nothing more than an extension cord??
Opposing views invited
Ahh, I feel much better now, Thanks!! [Linked Image]
Happy Scott

Stay up to Code with the Latest NEC:


>> 2023 NEC & Related Reference & Exam Prep
2023 NEC & Related Reference & Study Guides

Pass Your Exam the FIRST TIME with the Latest NEC & Exam Prep

>> 2020 NEC & Related Reference & Study Guides
 

#80088 02/25/02 09:21 PM
Joined: Jan 2001
Posts: 1,044
Tom Offline
Member
See my reply at the end of the thread that got you going. They are definitely not extension cords.

Tom


Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example.
#80089 02/26/02 07:18 PM
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,392
S
Member
III. Required Outlets
210.50 General.

Receptacle outlets shall be installed as specified in 210.52 through 210.63.
(A) Cord Pendants. A cord connector that is supplied by a permanently connected cord pendant shall be considered a receptacle outlet.
(B) Cord Connections. A receptacle outlet shall be installed wherever flexible cords with attachment plugs are used. Where flexible cords are permitted to be permanently connected, receptacles shall be permitted to be omitted for such cords.


Ok....Maybe it's not an 'extention' cord, maybe it's a 'flexible' cord...??

#80090 02/26/02 08:33 PM
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 4,116
Likes: 4
Member
Electure,

According to the UL 'White Book' this would be a violation. I have Highlighted a section for emphasis:
Quote
Relocatable Power Taps


Guide Information for Electrical Equipment for Use in Ordinary Locations

USE
This category covers relocatable power taps rated 250 V ac or less, 20 A or less, intended for indoor use as relocatable multiple outlet extensions of a branch circuit to supply laboratory equipment, home workshops, home movie lighting controls, musical instrumentation, and to provide outlet receptacles for computers, audio and video equipment, and other equipment . They consist of an attachment plug and a length of flexible cord terminated in an enclosure in which one or more receptacles are mounted. They may, in addition, be provided with fuses or other supplementary overcurrent protection, switches, suppression components and/or indicator lights in any combination, or connections for cable, communications, telephone and/or antenna.

INSTALLATION
Relocatable power taps are intended to be directly connected to a permanently installed branch circuit receptacle. Relocatable power taps are not intended to be series connected (daisy chained) to other relocatable power taps or to extension cords.


Relocatable power taps are not intended for use at construction sites and similar locations.

Relocatable power taps are not intended to be permanently secured to building structures, tables, work benches or similar structures, nor are they intended to be used as a substitute for fixed wiring. The cords of relocatable power taps are not intended to be routed through walls, windows, ceilings, floors or similar openings.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
For additional information, see Electrical Equipment for Use in Ordinary Locations (AALZ).

REQUIREMENTS
The basic standard used to investigate products in this category is UL 1363, "Relocatable Power Taps."

UL MARK
The Listing Mark of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. on the product is the only method provided by UL to identify products manufactured under its Listing and Follow-Up Service. The Listing Mark for these products includes the UL symbol (as illustrated in the Introduction of this Directory) together with the word "LISTED," a control number, and one of the following product names, as appropriate: "Relocatable Power Tap," "Power Tap" or "Outlet Strip."


Bill
#80091 02/26/02 09:30 PM
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,392
S
Member
Quote
Relocatable power taps are not intended to be permanently secured to building structures, tables, work benches or similar structures, nor are they intended to be used as a substitue for fixed wiring. cords of relocatable power taps are not intended to be routed through walls, windows, ceilings, floors or similar openings.

hmmmm, well this 'puter's TVSS exists simply due to lack of receptacle space, let's see....{tips over monitor} yep. 8 items plugged in, fax, ph, yadda, yadda....


Link Copied to Clipboard
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5