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#79323 12/14/01 10:36 PM
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pauluk Offline OP
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Is there anything in the NEC to prevent the installation of a washing machine in a bathroom?

I'm assuming that the room is big enough to get a suitable distance from the tub, and I also assume that under the current NEC the recept. would have to be GFI protected.

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#79324 12/14/01 10:55 PM
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Many apartments have Washer-Dryer combinations in the bathroom. Usually in a nook behind a bi-fold door, though.

#79325 12/15/01 05:46 AM
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pauluk Offline OP
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Thanks. The reason I asked is that it seems to be quite common on the Continent, particularly in Spain, but not here in England.

There's nothing against it here in the IEE Regs., so long as the 6' spacing from the tub can be achieved. It would also have to be hard-wired. I've never seen it done here though.

#79326 12/15/01 06:25 AM
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Electrically,
here it would be a 'dedicated receptacle' and therefore not GFI. I'm not sure how the spacing, as being next to a basin and/or bath, would affect this.

Practically,
I had one customer, washer in bath, who's agitator was one of those that when up and down, instead of the more common side to side. Given a wet floor, the unit hopped it's way into blocking the door, while yanking it's discharge hose from the standpipe....quite the flood!

#79327 12/15/01 11:23 AM
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Sparky,
There is no "dedicated receptacle" exception in 210-8(a)(1).
Don(resqcapt19)


Don(resqcapt19)
#79328 12/15/01 02:21 PM
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hmm, no there isn't, your right.

and we can't just say 210.11(c)(3)EX either , due to 210.11(C)(2) ?!

Looks like a 20A dedicated GFI in a bathrooom ......

#79329 12/15/01 04:27 PM
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pauluk Offline OP
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Sparky,

Kind of a complicated way to go about washing the bathroom floor if you ask me..... [Linked Image]

Why a 20A GFI circuit? With no heating element in U.S. machines, surely a 15A would be sufficient?

#79330 12/15/01 06:05 PM
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Paul,
NEC stipulates a 20A laundry circuit, and if it's in the bath, the 'dedicated' thing we can let fly elsewhere does not here, so GFI it is, and IF it were the sole receptacle on said circuit, it would need to be 20A [Linked Image]

#79331 12/15/01 06:56 PM
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pauluk Offline OP
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Fair enough. If it's a 20A circuit with one outlet then a 20A recept. makes sense, and if the NEC says 20A laundry circuit then 20A it is. But I wonder why they specify a cct. that will take up to 2400W for a load that at most will be much less than that, even if you take the 120% rule into account.

Actually, does the NEC consider a washer a continuous load for cct. rating?

#79332 12/15/01 07:25 PM
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Paul,

A Laundry area might also have an Iron being used there that might better justify the 20A circuit.

Bill


Bill
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