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#78885 11/05/01 12:04 PM
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 81
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Member
If in Article 517.13 it states
Grounding of Receptacles and Fixed Electric Equipment in Patient Care Areas

The section was completely revised to read as follows:

Wiring in patient care areas must comply with (A) and (B) below:
(A) Wiring Methods. All branch circuits serving patient care areas must be installed in a metal raceway or cable that is listed in 250.118 as an acceptable grounding return path, such as EMT and/or Type AC cable. Figure 517-1

(B) Insulated Equipment Grounding Conductor. In areas used for patient care, the grounding terminals of all receptacles and all noncurrent-carrying conductive surfaces of fixed electric equipment operating at over 100V, likely to become energized and subject to personal contact, must be grounded by an insulated copper equipment grounding conductor. The grounding conductor must be sized in accordance with Table 250.122 and it must be installed in a wiring method as identified in (A) above. Figure 517-2

Author’s Comment: AC cable is listed as a suitable ground fault path because it contains an internal bonding strip of aluminum in direct contact with the metal armored [250.118(9)]. The outer metal sheath of interlocked MC cable is not listed as a suitable ground fault path in 250.118(11), therefore it cannot be used to supply branch circuits in patient care areas of health care facilities. Figure 517-3
Intent: This section was completely revised to clarify that only metal raceways or armored cables listed as a ground return path containing an insulated copper equipment grounding conductor can be used for branch-circuit wiring supplying equipment, luminaires, and receptacles in patient care areas of health care facilities.

My question is can I use a 12/2 MC cable with an Isolated Ground according to this it doesn't seem so but the extra ground should do the same job as done in the AC cable. Any opions or comments.

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#78886 11/05/01 01:22 PM
Joined: Nov 2000
Posts: 2,148
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The intent of the code is to have an external metallic surface that is listed for equipment grounding. Unless you have the type of MC cable that has an outer metallic covering listed for use as an equipment grounding conductor, you can't use MC.


Don(resqcapt19)
#78887 11/08/01 03:37 PM
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 81
G
Member
I may be missing something here but 12/2 mc has a ground then if you place an isolated ground in there too is that not complying with the intent of the code? In other words I stuck here with this one and need some help

#78888 11/08/01 04:36 PM
Joined: Nov 2000
Posts: 2,148
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No, The external surface of the cable must be a listed equipment grounding conductor. They want the external surface to be in contact with the building components to provide multiple parallel grounding paths.
Don(resqcapt19)


Don(resqcapt19)
#78889 11/08/01 05:52 PM
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 81
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Member
Thanks for the help I may have some real fun trying to find a replacement for some applications. But asking was worth the try

#78890 11/08/01 06:01 PM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 599
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Member
Ggardiner, AFC makes a hospital grade type AC cable with a full size equipment grounding conductor. It should serve your purpose just fine.

#78891 11/08/01 10:29 PM
Joined: Nov 2000
Posts: 2,148
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Member
Yes, AC cable is fine as long as it has an internal equipment grounding conductor. The outer metallic covering of AC cable is listed as an equipment grounding conductor, while the outer coverning of MC cable is not. By the way any AC cable with an internal EGC is suitable. There is no requirement to use the green hospital grade AC cable.
Don(resqcapt19)


Don(resqcapt19)
#78892 11/09/01 07:57 AM
Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 4,291
Member
www.afcweb.com/afccable.html
Their SoCA distribution center is right down the street from me.



[This message has been edited by electure (edited 11-09-2001).]

#78893 11/09/01 09:22 AM
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 81
G
Member
Thanks but unfortunatly in one county in California they won't allow AC cable used in Health Care. whichs puts me back to square one thanks anyway

#78894 11/09/01 07:31 PM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 599
N
Member
The entire county or just a particular city. Which one?

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