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#74607 01/28/07 02:47 AM
Joined: May 2003
Posts: 2,876
E
e57 Offline OP
Member
Could someone please tell me what the difference is between a General and a Residential Journeyman? No, not just what laws are out there... These are the two new CA classifications...

I mean what is a "Residential Electrician"? And why would the skills or knowledge be any different?


Mark Heller
"Well - I oughta....." -Jackie Gleason
#74608 01/28/07 05:14 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,438
Member
I've only taken the General Jman test, but I assume there wouldn't be all the fire alarm system, 3 phase, show window, 180VA/yoke, etc.. type questions on the test....

#74609 01/28/07 07:16 AM
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 31
J
Junior Member
In St. Louis we only have contractor licenses but as a contractor I can tell that there is a major difference between a good commerical or general electrician and an individual who is rated for residential. The residential electrical is good with romex and single phase. I have an individual who is a great residential guy but don't ask him to work solo in a commerical job. He just doesn't understand three phase and would have trouble with laying out circuits and motor loads. There any people who work in residential new construction all the time and there skills are good for what they do , just as a good commerical guy doesn't do well in the residential setting.

#74610 01/28/07 08:38 AM
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 64
J
Member
I am not from california, but it is probably similar. here we have special low voltage, can only do lv, special residential, can only do residential and a couple other special licneces. we then have the general electrician though that term is not actually used.

One covers all of the above, the others are limits on what a person can do. And yes the skills sets are very different.

#74611 01/28/07 01:15 PM
Joined: Jan 2005
Posts: 5,316
Cat Servant
Member
I believe that the distinction was first made by the IBEW. They have had, for some time, "Inside Wireman" and "Residential Wireman" classifications.

"Inside Wiremen," if I remember correctly, is what most of us think of when we say "electrician." There is a 5 year apprenticeship.

"Residential Wiremen" is a 3 year apprenticeship, and has a lower pay scale.

And .. for those who ask ... "Outside Wireman" was the term for PoCo linemen.

#74612 01/28/07 03:05 PM
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 272
A
Member
Below are the license types for electricians in the state of Utah.

License Types
Apprentice Electrician
Journeyman Electrician
Master Electrician
Residential Journeyman Electrician
Residential Master Electrician

This is the link to the rules & qualifications for each license type. http://www.dopl.utah.gov/licensing/statutes_and_rules/R156-55b.pdf



[This message has been edited by A-Line (edited 01-28-2007).]

#74613 01/28/07 06:32 PM
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 421
Member
reno,
I can only speak for my local where the scale and bennies are identical..for both JW and RW

and JWs can work in Residential, but
RWs cannot do commercial or industiral

other than that you are 100% correct


Tom
#74614 01/28/07 07:20 PM
Joined: Jan 2005
Posts: 74
T
Member
Here in Connecticut, there is two "electrical" licenses’, E1 and E2

An E1 can do any form of electrical work; up to the power company connection point, an E2 can do the same, but only in the employ of an E1. Apprentices don't count as E2 till they have passed an exam.

There used to be an E-9 license here for Residential only, but that got phased out many years ago.

As far as low voltage, there is wayyyyy to many licenses’ [see below] phone only, low voltage upto x voltage, low voltage up to y voltage, kinda confusing, and sadly, those separation lines are crossed often.

Pulled fro State of Ct, Department of Consumer Protection

Dollar amounts are the yearly fee, not including newly required continuing education


"Electrical work" means the installation, erection, maintenance, alteration or repair of any wire, cable, conduit, busway, raceway, support, insulator, conductor, appliance, apparatus, fixture or equipment which generates, transforms, transmits or uses electrical energy for light, heat, power or other purposes.
E-1 Unlimited Electrical Contractor - $75.00
The holder of this license may do all electrical work as defined in section 20-330 of the General Statutes.
E-2 Unlimited Electrical Journeyperson - $45.00
The holder of this license may do the same work as an E-1 licensee, but only while in the employ of a contractor licensed for such work. OJT = 8000 hours RI = 576 hours

L-5 Limited Electrical Contractor - $75.00
The holder of this license may perform only work limited to ADT, similar or low voltage signal work, audio and sound systems. The installation or repair of any electrical work for plating or similar low voltage work is not authorized. The voltage of the system is not to exceed 25 volts or five amperes where such work commences at an outlet receptacle or connection previously installed by a person holding the proper electrical license.

L-6 Limited Electrical Journeyperson - $45.00
The holder of this license may perform the same work as the L-5 licensee, but only while in the employ of a contractor licensed for such work. OJT = 4000 hours RI = 288 hours

C-5 Limited Electrical Contractor - $75.00
The holder of this license may perform only work limited to ADT, similar or low voltage signal work, audio and sound systems, and telephone-interconnect systems. The installation, repair, maintenance of any electrical work for plating is not authorized. The voltage of any system is not to exceed forty-eight (48 ) volts or five (5) amperes where such work commences at an outlet receptacle or connection previously installed by a person holding the proper electrical license.

C-6 Limited Electrical Journeyperson - $45.00
The holder of this license may perform the same work as the C-5 licensee, but only while in the employ of a contractor licensed for such work. OJT = 4000 hours RI = 288 hours

T-1 Limited Electrical Contractor - $75.00
The holder of this license may perform only work limited to telephone-interconnect systems where such work commences at an outlet receptacle or connection previously installed by a person holding the proper electrical license.

T-2 Limited Electrical Journeyperson - $45.00
The holder of this license may perform the same work as the T-1 licensee, but only while in the employ of contractor licensed for such work.

Requirements for this exam: completion of a bona fide apprenticeship program or at least four years of equivalent experience and training or five years as a registered public service technician. OJT = 4000 hours RI = 288 hours

L-1 Limited Electrical Line Contractor - $75.00
The holder of this license may perform only work limited to line construction, including distribution systems, and their allied work, for public and private companies; installation,
maintenance repair of all high voltage cable splicing and pulling wire for all systems in excess of 2,400 volts; traffic signal and highway lighting installation, maintenance and repair.
L-2 Limited Electrical Line Journeyperson - $45.00
The holder of this license may perform the same work as an L-1 licensee, but only while in the employ of a contractor licensed for such work. OJT = 8000 hours RI = 576 hours
Elevator Installation, Repair & Maintenance Work Licenses: Licenses Expire annually: August 31st

#74615 01/29/07 05:40 AM
Joined: May 2003
Posts: 2,876
E
e57 Offline OP
Member
So some of you say "Skills'? I don't buy it....

Residential is not off limits for pipe work, exterior, services, and locally here anything below 8' can not be exposed MN, or MC. We have many class 2 structures as residential highrises. Multi-unit buildings with 120/208 services, and 277/480 common area lighting and equipment. A difference in voltage is also not a 'skill'. I dont see much of a difference in calculations, spare a few factors of 3 phase - but the math is at no higher level. Even into explosion proof - I do not see that as a 'skill' - sure some added knowledge about the design and sealing - but not a 'skill'....

IMO it is a form of disenfranchisement. Not by limiting one person to residential work, but limiting him from competetion for other work!


Mark Heller
"Well - I oughta....." -Jackie Gleason
#74616 01/29/07 09:50 PM
Joined: Mar 2004
Posts: 98
O
Member
http://arcweb.sos.state.or.us/rules/OARS_900/OAR_918/918_282.html


This is Oregons definition.

You are limited as to what you can do.
Also alot less $.

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