ECN Electrical Forum - Discussion Forums for Electricians, Inspectors and Related Professionals
ECN Shout Chat
ShoutChat
Recent Posts
Violation?
by renosteinke - 01/27/23 09:52 PM
Does NEC 551.71 (F) apply to dwellings?
by BigB - 01/20/23 10:46 AM
Power submeter connections
by HotLine1 - 01/19/23 09:09 AM
AFDD's coming to the UK
by Texas_Ranger - 01/17/23 07:22 PM
New in the Gallery:
Burger King crown sillyness
Burger King crown sillyness
by wa2ise, December 11
240/208 to a house
240/208 to a house
by wa2ise, October 9
Who's Online Now
0 members (), 61 guests, and 15 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Rate Thread
#7296 01/30/02 09:05 AM
Joined: Jan 2002
Posts: 13
R
Member
Has anyone wired a residential basement with the new engineered wood joists? They look like an I-Beam made out of wood, with a 2x3 on the top and bottom, and CDX plywood 1/2 X 12 in the center. I was wondering where you attach the boxes, and what do you use to staple the Romex to them.

#7297 01/30/02 09:19 AM
Joined: Mar 2001
Posts: 2,056
R
Member
Ron,
We had a thread titled "Drilling Beams" about 2 months back that had lots of info on these products, including a link to manufacturers.

#7298 01/30/02 09:29 AM
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 2,749
Member


Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant
#7299 01/30/02 10:15 PM
Joined: Nov 2000
Posts: 2,236
Likes: 1
Member
I think that thread was about "Glulam" which differs from the I-beam with an "OSB" web and cap strips made of actual lumber...

Most that I've seen have "knock-outs" about every four feet, I would guess by the location of the KO's that anywhere along the web, dead center vertically, is fair game.

Just MHO...


-Virgil
Residential/Commercial Inspector
5 Star Inspections
Member IAEI
#7300 01/30/02 11:19 PM
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 444
S
Member
These joists are used widely in our area. You can pretty much drill any where on the web of these joists, provided that your hole isn't larger than 1" You are permitted to make larger holes, but you must stay away from either end of the joist. Most lumber yards/suppliers will provide you with a schedule of how far you have to be from the ends of the joist to make a larger diameter hole. Naturally, the wider the joist, the better support it provides, and the closer you can drill at either end of the joist. Also as pointed out earlier, some manufacturers have premade 'knockouts' running at 2-4' intervals along the span of the joist. Just take a hammer and punch them out. A really ingenious idea and saves much drilling. As far as mounting of the boxes and stapling, we use the lower part of the 2x3 for this, just as you would on a normal wood joist.

Cheers!

[This message has been edited by Sandro (edited 01-30-2002).]

#7301 01/31/02 06:35 AM
Joined: Mar 2001
Posts: 2,056
R
Member
I think the link addresses both types of products (I-joists & Glulam).

#7302 01/31/02 08:32 AM
Joined: Nov 2000
Posts: 2,236
Likes: 1
Member
Doh... You're right Redsy, it does...

(Boy I should read more thouroughly before I speak...)


-Virgil
Residential/Commercial Inspector
5 Star Inspections
Member IAEI
#7303 01/31/02 02:24 PM
Joined: Jan 2002
Posts: 13
R
Member
I received this answer from a Enginer at Boise Cascade Wood Products.
It is ok to attach lightweight items like light boxes to either the
bottom flange or web of BCI joists. Generally, 8d nails are the best to
use for light loads such as yours. Drywall/wood screws less than 3/16"
in diameter are good too. The most important thing is to not use too big
a nail/screw as you could split the flange. Page 31 of our specifier
guide http://www.bcewp.com/ssg2001-31.pdf has a table showing the
closest allowable nail spacings.

Frank Powell, Jr. P.E.
Product Application Engineer
Boise Cascade

#7304 02/01/02 08:00 AM
Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 4,291
Member
We use these a lot. The general rule we've been asked to follow is that any conduit larger than 1" must be supported by the top flange. (w/ angle bracket and rod)

[This message has been edited by electure (edited 02-01-2002).]

#7305 02/02/02 11:51 AM
Joined: Jun 2001
Posts: 161
M
Member
For attaching larger things like fan support boxes use a couple of pieces of 3/4" blocking on either side of the OSB web with a little construction adhesive and screws long enough to go through to the other blocking piece. This allows you to put screws in the bottom runner as well as above in the web area. Builders always have scraps of 3/4" OSB sheathing laying around that are perfect for this.


Mike Wescoatt

Link Copied to Clipboard
Featured:

Tools for Electricians
Tools for Electricians
 

* * * * * * *
2023 National Electrical Code (NEC)
2023 NEC Now Available!
 
* * * * * * *

2020 Master Electrician Exam Preparation Combos
2020 NEC Electrician
Exam Prep Combos:
Master / Journeyman

 

Member Spotlight
Joe Tedesco
Joe Tedesco
Boston, Massachusetts USA
Posts: 2,749
Joined: October 2000
Top Posters(30 Days)
BigB 9
triple 3
Popular Topics(Views)
302,479 Are you busy
231,873 Re: Forum
216,499 Need opinion
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5