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#65277 - 05/01/06 01:21 PM Tumbler switches....  
SvenNYC  Offline
Member
Joined: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,691
New York City
Why are they called that?

I've usually seen the term applied to the square or cylindrical surface-mount switches.


Work Gear for Electricians and the Trades

#65278 - 05/01/06 09:21 PM Re: Tumbler switches....  
frenchelectrican  Offline
Member
Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 939
Wi/ Paris France { France for ...
the tumbler switch can be found in motor or industrail control panel it will look like a handle outside of the door panel but inside will look like " open " drum switch with large number of concats.

this is very common on older control panels but newer one are controled by plc system but however for some still used the tumbler switch on it currentally. [ not too widespread ]

the last time i did see tumbler switch was in power control panel [ for multi generator units ] it have 12 lead connected to the " drum " switch

hope it help you with this

Merci, Marc


Pas de problme,il marche n'est-ce pas?"(No problem, it works doesn't it?)


#65279 - 05/01/06 11:23 PM Re: Tumbler switches....  
gfretwell  Offline


Member
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 9,122
Estero,Fl,usa
They still use Furnas 58 drum switches on boat hoist motors.


Greg Fretwell

#65280 - 05/01/06 11:56 PM Re: Tumbler switches....  
SvenNYC  Offline
Member
Joined: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,691
New York City
OK, I'm confused.

I just visited Appleton's website and saw what THEY call a "tumbler switch" (an enclosed heavy-duty switch with a metal handle).

What I've commonly seen called a tumbler switch is usually one of these:

[Linked Image]

or this:

[Linked Image]

Yeah. I know they misspelled "tumbler". [Linked Image]

[This message has been edited by SvenNYC (edited 05-02-2006).]


#65281 - 05/02/06 03:34 AM Re: Tumbler switches....  
Alan Belson  Offline
Member
Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,803
Mayenne N. France
Because of the need to break contacts fast enough to prevent them wearing from arc damage, 'tumblers' were developed from the original crude knife switches.
The 'tumbler' is a mechanism which on pressing the switch lever places the contacts under an increasing spring load, and is arranged so that when sufficient force exists, at some point in the stroke, the contact set suddenly 'tumbles' rapidly into the closed or open position, reducing arcing. Early mechanisms were clunky and heavily preloaded to ensure a crisp action. Modern switches have been developed in which the forces are much lower due to smaller and lighter moving parts, precision mouldings and superior plastics, but it's the same principle.

Alan


Wood work but can't!

#65282 - 05/02/06 07:07 AM Re: Tumbler switches....  
pauluk  Offline
Member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,520
Norfolk, England
Here's a British tumbler switch, 1940s/early 1950s style (Britmac "Little Briton" rated 250V 5A AC/DC). Note the spring linkage between the operating handle and the contacts below:

[Linked Image]

--------------------------------------------

Starting from the "on" position, thus:

[Linked Image]

--------------------------------------------

Moving the handle upwards toward "off" moves the top of the tumbler assembly downward (foreground of photo), but all it does initially is to start tensioning the spring:

[Linked Image]

--------------------------------------------

Handle moved over the greater part of its travel, but contacts still firmly closed:
[Linked Image]

--------------------------------------------

Almost there now, note the position of the spring with the top of the tumbler almost at the "point of no return":

[Linked Image]

--------------------------------------------

Until finally, on the very last portion of the travel the spring snaps the contacts open quickly:
[Linked Image]



[This message has been edited by pauluk (edited 05-02-2006).]


#65283 - 05/02/06 08:51 AM Re: Tumbler switches....  
SvenNYC  Offline
Member
Joined: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,691
New York City
AHHHH!!!!

Thanks Paul & Alan.

Fascinating. So then the term applies to any standard toggle or rocker switch, not just the surface mount types. [Linked Image]

[This message has been edited by SvenNYC (edited 05-02-2006).]


#65284 - 05/02/06 12:21 PM Re: Tumbler switches....  
gfretwell  Offline


Member
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 9,122
Estero,Fl,usa
Are we talking about "Snap switches"?


Greg Fretwell

#65285 - 05/02/06 07:37 PM Re: Tumbler switches....  
earlydean  Offline
Member
Joined: Dec 2003
Posts: 751
Griswold, CT, USA
So.......ball-bat switch, toggle switch, snap switch, tumbler switch, they are all the same switch, different name.


Earl

#65286 - 05/03/06 05:19 AM Re: Tumbler switches....  
Texas_Ranger  Offline
Member
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 2,402
Vienna, Austria
On some worn switches similar to the one pictured it can even happen you move the handle all the way and it takes a second or two until the tumbler moves... about the only type of failure I've ever seen with that type of switch.


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