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#4418 09/25/01 06:53 PM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 599
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Nick Offline OP
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Many municipalities around here are at least a code cycle behind in adopting the current NEC. My question is as follows.

When the more recent code becomes more stringent the city cannot enforce that code until they have adopted that edition, right? What about the flip side to that. If the current code relaxes a requirement and a contractor installs per this new not a stringent rule, does the city have to accept it even if they have not adopted that cycle? Or is it up to their discretion wether to accept it or not? Just curious what everyone's take is on this.

#4419 09/25/01 07:14 PM
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 4,081
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Nick,

I think it is always up to their discretion.
Did you have something specific in mind?


Bill
#4420 09/25/01 07:23 PM
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,392
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My state will formally adopt the 2002 sometime around June, July. I guess the state inspectors need time to bone up on it.

Until such time, the 99' flys, warts & all.
A good case in point for 'relaxed' standards would be the ol' gas pipe bond
(heee-hawww mule bayin' )
[Linked Image] [Linked Image]

#4421 09/25/01 09:07 PM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 599
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Nick Offline OP
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Nothing specific in mind. Just a general question. The last two juristictions I have worked in are still under the '96 code and here we are just getting 2002. [Linked Image]

#4422 09/25/01 09:19 PM
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 4,081
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Maybe I haven't been paying attention, but I always thought that the Code acception was automatic and immediate around here (NY). Does anybody know?

You know, it's funny but all this global interaction here can really make someone have to rethink what they already "know" and stop taking everything for granted. Has anyone else noticed that?

Bill


Bill
#4423 09/25/01 09:59 PM
Joined: Jun 2001
Posts: 642
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Here the new code will be adopted somewhere around Jun - Aug. Untill then 1999 applies. After that most inspectors use the date you pulled the permit to rule on short term jobs. It can lead to a lot of discussion on longer term jobs. Usually what ever the inspector says will rule--not always depends on how far along the job is.


ed
#4424 09/26/01 06:19 AM
Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 4,291
Member
Learned this one early on:
I saw an old electrician scratching his head & kicking the ground in about '75. Seems he had put all his 4 wire homeruns in 1/2" EMT on the store he was building. Los Angeles County was still going by '68 Code's wirefill, which only allowed 3 #12 in a 1/2" conduit. (7 years later)
Yes, they made him tear it all out. Seems like inspectors reject change of any kind until they're forced to accept it.

#4425 09/27/01 03:23 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 176
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Member
In my experience, I have seen some states that have an automatic acceptance of the NEC. I think South Carolina does. There are some municipalities that adopt the code, and have local ordinances that override some portions of the NEC. This usually occurs in areas pertaining to mobile homes, RV parks, etc., and are more stringent. I don't recall ever having the NEC relaxed.

#4426 09/27/01 03:34 PM
Joined: Nov 2000
Posts: 2,148
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Automatic acceptance of the new code is not legal. It is a law when adopted by a governmental unit and must be approved by the legislative unit of government in the same manner as any other law. The courts have ruled that laws must specifically state the edition of the code that is to be used. If the law would state "current edition", the edition that was available at the time that the law was passed would be the legal code forever, unless changed by the passage of a new law.
Don(resqcapt19)


Don(resqcapt19)
#4427 09/27/01 06:36 PM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,520
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Hmm, interesting reading.

Are there any other examples of the current NEC (or local/state codes) being LESS stringent than in the past?

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