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Joined: Dec 2002
Posts: 308
E
Edward Offline OP
Member
I was asked this question by a home owner
" why can't i use a cord and a end plug for my spa plug into a clothes dryers outlet whenever i want to use my spa?

Here is what i said.
" first the dryers outlet is not GFCI protected, Secondly it is not rated for 50Amps third the cord will creat trip hazard."

any other reasons you can think of?

Thanks


Thanks
Edward
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,407
Member
Edward,
Putting a cord on a piece of equipment like this, would make it an appliance, no matter the current draw.
Considering that the thing is outdoors, would entail that it has GFCI protection as a minimum.

Joined: Jan 2001
Posts: 1,044
Tom Offline
Member
Interesting. If the spa is located outdoors, cord & plug connections are allowed, but I've never seen a dryer receptacle installed outdoors.

Indoors, a cord & plug connection is allowed, but only at 20 amps or less. So this spa cannot be plugged into a dryer receptacle if the spa is located indoors. It needs a connection by a Chapter 3 wiring method.

Tom


Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example.
Joined: Nov 2003
Posts: 269
E
Member
A dryer receptacle has no equipment ground. It is a 125/250V non-grounding receptacle. You are no longer allowed to use the neutral to ground equipment. The 3pole 4 wire grounding receptacle would have to be used.

[This message has been edited by electricman2 (edited 01-10-2004).]


John
Joined: Apr 2001
Posts: 507
G
Member
"Indoors, a cord & plug connection is allowed, but only at 20 amps or less"

Tom,
Where does this rule come from?
What about kitchen ranges? Cord & plug connection at 50-60 amps.

GJ

Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 4,035
Likes: 1
Member
Edward,

If it's inside 680.43 w/Exception says it can't be cord and plug connected over 20A

As the person installing it that's all I have to know.

Tom,

Have you seen many Outdoor cord-and-plug connected Hot Tubs?

Bill

[This message has been edited by Bill Addiss (edited 01-10-2004).]


Bill
Joined: Dec 2002
Posts: 308
E
Edward Offline OP
Member
Thanks for your replies.

But home owner's main question is "may he do that Installation per code?"

I said NO.

Do you guys see other downside to this type of installation besides the one posted above.

The unit is outdoor the plug is indoor.


(Bill)
(Have you seen many Outdoor cord-and-plug connected Hot Tubs?)

Although you havn't seen any cord and plug connected spas, but is it allowed per NEC and is it a good idea?


Thanks
Edward
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 680
W
Member
Lets say I'm going to install a hot tub indoors on a concrete slab. How do I get the wiring across the floor to the spa. A piece of SO seems like the best method but doesn't SO have to be in a cord set or can it hard wired with SO??

Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,389
S
Member
per 680.42(Outdoor Installations)A spa or hot tub installed outdoors shall comply with the provisions of Parts I and II of this article, except as permitted in 680.42(A) and (B), that would otherwise apply to pools installed outdoors.

680.42(A)(2)..

(2) Cord-and-Plug Connections. Cord-and-plug connections with a cord not longer than 4.6 m (15 ft) shall be permitted where protected by a ground-fault circuit interrupter.

bold mine

this part is confusing as (correct me if i'm off) they are making reference to pool usage in section IV Spas and Hot Tubs

Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 66
C
Member
"Lets say I'm going to install a hot tub indoors on a concrete slab. How do I get the wiring across the floor to the spa. A piece of SO seems like the best method but doesn't SO have to be in a cord set or can it hard wired with SO??"

I'm not an electrician, and i don't know all the detail of the code, such as putting a cord on a spa, but it just sounds like a terrible idea.

to get power to the spa in the center of a contrete slab, you could rent (or hire someone with) a power breaker and chip out a grove in the floor, put a pipe in in and then fill it back up with concrete.

another option, since you say it is indoors would be to build a false pillar right next to the spa. the wiring could go up the center of the pillar and then go through the ceiling. you could mount hooks on the pillar for hanging towels and clothing for spa users.

For the post about plugging in the spa to a dryer outlet when you want to use it- Just tell the homeowner that besides the fact that it violates code, it will be very inconvenient. When you want to use the spa, you will have to plug it in a couple hours before you plan to use it so it can warm up. also, spas get really nasty if the water is not circulated frequently. if it was left unplugged for a 5 days or so, it will get NASTY no matter how many chemicals you put in it.

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