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Joined: Apr 2022
Posts: 8
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Originally Posted by dsk
The grounding/Neutral system will not make any problems, many European places do still use a 230V system without a Neutral. Y transformer with 230V between the legs does have approx 130V from each leg to ground.
Where you are (in Norway?) do you tend to see more 400Y/230 or 230Y/132 utility distribution systems?

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Joined: Jun 2014
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dsk Offline OP
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Most of Norway has traditionally had a Y 230. but the center point has not been bonded to ground, so it has usually not been a neutral at all. New transformers for new buildings use the more common European system of 400/230V Y, quite similar to the US 480/277V system. It has been some regional differences, The Stavanger area used the 230/400 (Earlier 380/220) system, Arendal area used a grounded center on the 230y but no Neutral wire in the supply system.

1 member likes this: tortuga
Joined: May 2002
Posts: 384
H
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Interesting question DSK and it was one that first brought me to this forum when I was seconded to the USA from 240V 50Hz land. I had a fair bit of 240V workshop equipment plus that very British of requirements a 240V kettle, all 3kW of it! The question I asked at the time (in the very early noughties) was can a 240V (NEMA6-20) be installed in a US kitchen?

A great deal of debate ensued including issues around GFCI which, as has been pointed out above, can be rather expensive. The final outcome was that yes I could as it was for a dedicated piece of equipment and that the code requirements for GFCI in the kitchen only applied to 120V circuits.

A search might find the original post but it has surpassed my ability to do so.

Joined: Jul 2004
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G
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Originally Posted by Hutch
Interesting question DSK and it was one that first brought me to this forum when I was seconded to the USA from 240V 50Hz land. I had a fair bit of 240V workshop equipment plus that very British of requirements a 240V kettle, all 3kW of it! The question I asked at the time (in the very early noughties) was can a 240V (NEMA6-20) be installed in a US kitchen?

A great deal of debate ensued including issues around GFCI which, as has been pointed out above, can be rather expensive. The final outcome was that yes I could as it was for a dedicated piece of equipment and that the code requirements for GFCI in the kitchen only applied to 120V circuits.

A search might find the original post but it has surpassed my ability to do so.


It is true that 210.8 (A) still says

Quote
(A) Dwelling Units. All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-
ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in
210.8(A)(1) through (10) shall have ground-fault circuit-
interrupter protection for personnel.


Greg Fretwell
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 9,940
Likes: 34
G
Member
I other than dwelling units your 6-15 would need GFCI protection in a kitchen.

Quote
(B) Other Than Dwelling Units. All single-phase receptacles
rated 150 volts to ground or less, 50 amperes or less and three-
phase receptacles rated 150 volts to ground or less,
100 amperes or less installed in the following locations shall
have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel


Greg Fretwell
Joined: May 2002
Posts: 384
H
Member
Originally Posted by gfretwell
It is true that 210.8 (A) still says

[quote](A) Dwelling Units. All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-
ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in
210.8(A)(1) through (10) shall have ground-fault circuit-
interrupter protection for personnel.

It should be highlighted, through omission, as the 'Englishman's Clause' smile
Tea anyone ? ...

Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 9,940
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G
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The tea kettle seems to be the only attractive appliance for 230-240v. Most things do quite well with 1440 watts max. Since we don't drink that much hot tea here, it hasn't been an issue. I cold brew my iced tea, no global warming involved at all wink


Greg Fretwell
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 7,384
Likes: 7
Member
We have had a few residential, (high end) that have 30 amp, and 50 amp 240 volt receptacles in the kitchens or adjacent 'butler pantry. Rice cookers, and oh yes, the 'tea kettle' (mini boiler).

Design pro, and ECs installed GFI breakers; no argument from me.


John
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 24
E
Member
Originally Posted by Hutch
The question I asked at the time (in the very early noughties) was can a 240V (NEMA6-20) be installed in a US kitchen?

A search might find the original post but it has surpassed my ability to do so.

https://www.electrical-contractor.net/forums/ubbthreads.php/topics/82613/

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