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#221073 12/03/20 07:08 PM
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 4
Ronny Offline OP
New Member
How many of you have come across this before?

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Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 7,381
Likes: 7
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OK
That's one I haven't seen yet!

Goes with the panel directory.....lights, lights, lights.......outlets, outlets, outlets etc.

Thanks


John
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 23
E
Member
My favorite panel directory entry was the one I found labeled "HOUSE."

Sad part is, it was accurate. Livingroom, diningroom, all four bedrooms. Lights and receptacles. This family used to coordinate TV watching against dinner preparation and vacuuming the floor.

Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 2,498
T
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In 230 V territory that wasn't all that uncommon back in the day, at least for smaller apartments. Houses had up to three fuses. I distinctly remember seeing pictures from a Munich apartment built some time between 1965 and 1973 (major changes of regs., 1965 saw the new wire colours and 1973 the ban of TN-C final circuits), with a 24-space distribution board populated with one lonely 16 amp MCB. Hot water and heat were presumably central, cooking most likely gas. Dishwashers weren't really a thing back then and washing machines had barely started to become popular so in reality 3500 W was reasonable for a 1-BR.

Once I even saw the meter setup from a rural cottage presumably first wired for electricity in the 1940s or early 50s. The meter has a maximum current of 10 amps at 220 V and there was one single 6 amp circuit (fused neutral).

Joined: Jul 2002
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Nice.......


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