ECN Electrical Forum - Discussion Forums for Electricians, Inspectors and Related Professionals
ECN Shout Chat
Top Posters(30 Days)
dsk 13
Admin 8
Recent Posts
Grid problem??
by annemarie1. 08/21/17 01:10 PM
Bathroom electrical
by doc. 08/19/17 06:53 AM
electircal ageing test on IPC
by SIAME. 08/15/17 02:43 AM
electrical aging test on IPC
by gfretwell. 08/15/17 12:27 AM
"Line level" audio on Cat 5?
by gfretwell. 08/08/17 10:39 PM
New in the Gallery:
Gallery Test
Popular Topics(Views)
240,051 Are you busy
175,671 Re: Forum
167,890 Need opinion
Who's Online Now
0 registered members (), 69 guests, and 10 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Rate This Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2
#218032 - 01/19/17 09:25 AM Safety at heights?  
Trumpy  Offline


Member
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,217
SI,New Zealand
Folks,
I do a lot of work in my normal job that makes me work at heights, this could be anything from 3 metres (9') off the ground, up to 12 metres (36').
Just a question for you folks, if you guys have to do this sort of thing, how do you approach this?
Obviously there will be a harness, a safety line and some sort of lanyard/ fall arrest unit.
I'm not intrinsically sure what OSHA say about this sort of thing in the US, but I do know here, the person who is expected to do the work needs to have a work plan and a rescue plan, in case something goes wrong.
The floor is open for comments.................


Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

Arc Flash PPE Clothing, LOTO & Insulated Tools

#218037 - 01/19/17 11:16 PM Re: Safety at heights? [Re: Trumpy]  
gfretwell  Offline


Member
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 9,103
Estero,Fl,usa
In Florida there are lots of rules, not a lot of compliance.


Greg Fretwell

#218045 - 01/21/17 01:13 AM Re: Safety at heights? [Re: gfretwell]  
Trumpy  Offline


Member
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,217
SI,New Zealand
Greg,
That worries me somewhat, because there aren't a lot of accidents at work that will injure you as badly as a fall from height, especially if you fall on your head.

I've done a lot of lines rescue stuff with the NZ fire service here when people get themselves into trouble in various places, but it's sort of like when people are at work, they use the cheapest available harnesses and never get them inspected, so things wear out and when someone does have a fall, the harness breaks it's stitching.

The old "she'll be right" attitude really needs to be turned around.


Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

#218051 - 01/21/17 06:19 AM Re: Safety at heights? [Re: Trumpy]  
gfretwell  Offline


Member
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 9,103
Estero,Fl,usa
This all comes down to who the job super is and how well they monitor their sites. It is usually the one shot jobs like replacing an existing roof or tree trimming where I see the worst violations. I have never seen a roofer tied off and I see tree trimmers free climbing with a chain saw. In our (USA) litigious environment, the homeowner better be very sure his trades are licensed and insured.
That said, I still see guys on big projects who are not following proper procedures more often than I should.


Greg Fretwell

#218055 - 01/22/17 12:51 AM Re: Safety at heights? [Re: Trumpy]  
HotLine1  Offline


Member
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,858
Brick, NJ USA
Trumpy:

As Greg said,it's dependent on the jobsite here also. (NJ)

Lately, OSHA has generated a lot of publicity and large fines, mostly for unsafe excavations/trenching. A few days ago, $78,500 to one sewer contractor, no shoring, and lack of safety equipment (retrieval gear). No doubt the fine will be appealed, and a settlement with no liability will be the usual outcome.

I expect to see them whenever there is any type of incident that results in damages or injuries.



John

#218129 - 01/30/17 07:55 AM Re: Safety at heights? [Re: gfretwell]  
Trumpy  Offline


Member
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,217
SI,New Zealand
Greg,
I fully understand what you're saying, I mean, everyone wants to go home in the same state they came to work, with all their fingers, arms, legs and stuff like that.
But every now and then there will be a crew of guys that will do the job so much cheaper, no safety gear or an observer (especially trimming trees around live 22kV lines), a branch fell over two phases. and the guy tried to pull the branch off as it was burning, with his bare hand, he died on the spot, after the current went through his shoes.
Why is this stuff so difficult to get into people's heads?


Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

#218148 - 01/31/17 03:03 AM Re: Safety at heights? [Re: Trumpy]  
gfretwell  Offline


Member
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 9,103
Estero,Fl,usa
A lot of our workers come from south of the border where safety is an afterthought and they bring that culture with them. It is hard to get them with the program and unfortunately there were plenty of anglo managers who just think "there are more where he came from". The attitude is turning but there is nothing like an OSHA "go team" who show up after an accident to mold there opinion. Once they are in town, they hit as many jobs as they can before they move on to the next accident.
Usually they get pretty good compliance with hard hats and footwear. Other PPE and fall protection seems to be a little less prevalent. I still see guys walking the beam with a concrete hose fairly regularly. The best the super can do is be sure the ground around the wall is policed up so they won't land on broken block and rebar if they fall. Nobody wants to set up 150-200 feet of scaffolding to pump a truckload or two of concrete.


Greg Fretwell

#218526 - 05/31/17 08:02 PM Re: Safety at heights? [Re: Trumpy]  
Potseal  Offline
Member
Joined: Feb 2013
Posts: 236
Saskatchewan
Originally Posted by Trumpy
Greg,
I fully understand what you're saying, I mean, everyone wants to go home in the same state they came to work, with all their fingers, arms, legs and stuff like that.
But every now and then there will be a crew of guys that will do the job so much cheaper, no safety gear or an observer (especially trimming trees around live 22kV lines), a branch fell over two phases. and the guy tried to pull the branch off as it was burning, with his bare hand, he died on the spot, after the current went through his shoes.
Why is this stuff so difficult to get into people's heads?


It's amazing what some people will do when they panic or just don't stop and think.

Our shop's safety officer will routinely jump in a vehicle and not wear a seat belt because we're travelling a distance that is a few minutes away (unless I'm driving then we don't move until it's on). But get caught without hearing protection or such and he's all over you.


A malfunction at the junction

#218527 - 05/31/17 08:12 PM Re: Safety at heights? [Re: Trumpy]  
Potseal  Offline
Member
Joined: Feb 2013
Posts: 236
Saskatchewan
Back to the topic...

I once had a long debate with one of my former bosses, who at the time was really trying to enforce safety in the workplace (which was great), about the hypocrisy of the rules when it comes to Baker's scaffolding. I was working on a site where guys were installing suspended ceiling using it. For those not familiar it is a platform on wheels that is about 6 feet high. In the OH&S rules regarding it there does not need to be a safety railing and you do not need to be tied off. How is that possible? A safety trainer told me himself that a local tradesman died after taking a header off of one. Anybody see Baker's scaffolding used in a similar manner?


A malfunction at the junction

#218528 - 06/01/17 06:23 PM Re: Safety at heights? [Re: Trumpy]  
HotLine1  Offline


Member
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,858
Brick, NJ USA
I don't know the OSHA reg, but all the Baker scaffolds that I used when I operated my EC business had safety rails, and toe guards on the upper level. Also there were outriggers that were put on when the units were two (2) sections high (11' +/-). The OSHA inspector looked at it at least two or three times at different sites and did not have anything to say.

However, he did write a 'warning' for a cracked brim on a hard hat.

I do not know about a tie off, or where you could install a tie off on a lot of sites.

A big 'yay' for scissor lifts, genie 1-mans, and tele snorkels. Makes life a lot easier.


John

Page 1 of 2 1 2

Member Spotlight
Theelectrikid
Theelectrikid
Levittown, PA
Posts: 810
Joined: April 2004
Show All Member Profiles 
Featured:

2017 Master Electrician Exam Preparation Combos
2017 NEC Electrician
Exam Prep Combos:
Master / Journeyman

 

Shout Box
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.0
Page Time: 0.044s Queries: 16 (0.003s) Memory: 0.8251 MB (Peak: 1.0078 MB) Zlib enabled. Server Time: 2017-08-22 01:54:49 UTC