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Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 763
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KJay Offline OP
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Have you stocked up on 100-watt A-19 bulbs? Looks like time is running out.
I just bought a couple of 48 count cases to use in my basement workshop and shed lights. That should probably last me for a few more years anyway.

Joined: Mar 2004
Posts: 785
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I don't know anyone that uses 100 watt incandescents, except old people who put them in all their light fixtures and cook the sockets and wiring. (Not insinuating you're old!) Whenever I find this I usually scold them and tell them to use only 60's from now on. We have removed those old square recessed lights with 100W lamps in them and found charred building insulation on top of them.

Myself I have fluourescents in the garage and shop and mostly in the house too except for the cans. I am trying out some LED A-19s in the kitchen pendants. Even my drop light is fluourescent.

I did however consider a 100 or 150 cord hung over my workbench for heat in the winter!

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 763
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KJay Offline OP
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100 Watters are still very common around here. They are used in walk in freezers and coolers as well as being standard issue for crawl space, attic and basement keyless fixtures in old and new homes. I use them with the caged vapor tight fixtures in my shop because of all the sawdust and also in my storage shed because they are in close proximity to the pipe rack and subject to impact. I do also have fluorescents over the bench and main work areas.
Iíve tried the coil type CFLís and they donít work well in these locations because of colder temps in the winter. Even at 40-degrees, the regular 4-foot fluorescent tubes are dim until they warm up and come up to full brightness. The incandescent lights come on immediately regardless of temperature and provide good light in the mean time. You probably donít have this type of problem in Arizona.

Joined: Mar 2004
Posts: 947
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twh Offline
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I have eight 150 watt bulbs in my garage, but I only turn them on in the winter. It's a lot of heat.

I read an article some time ago about incandescent bulbs being sold in Europe as heaters. Buy a bunch of bulbs and re-label the boxes. Apparently, you'll make a lot of money selling incandescent heaters.

Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 2,492
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Actually they tried marketing incandescent bulbs as heaters in order to circumvent the EU-wide import and production ban. As far as I know they didn't succeed and a large shipment was confiscated by the customs.

However, the ban only applies to general purpose bulbs, all others (including any rough service bulbs) are exempt. Most hardware/DIY stores still have at least a small shelf with 100W rough service bulbs. They're quite expensive though, general purpose ones were around 50 cents each or even less, rough service are around 3 Euro apiece. About a week before the ban I went to a DIY store and bought at least 2 cases (I think 50 bulbs) of each wattage pearl bulbs (pearl were banned immediately, clear ones were allowed to survive for a little longer - the official reasoning was that CFLs with exposed filaments as a direct replacement for clear bulbs weren't invented at that point...).

Joined: Jul 2004
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I am migrating to CFLs where they will work for me but I still have a number of A-19s in places that use dimmers. My real work lights are all 4' fluorescent tube. (shop, garage, kitchen)
I am still using a lot of 15w sign bulbs and there is no CFL replacement for that. They never seem to burn out so it isn't really a problem.


Greg Fretwell
Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 367
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Big problem up here in Canada is the CFL's don't come to full brightness in the winter.

I came home from work at 5am this morning and at -20C I could have had more light with my BBQ lighter than with the coiled CFL I am trying over the back door. I have a couple of different brands to try and see if one is better outside than the others in the cold.

Joined: Mar 2004
Posts: 947
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twh Offline
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LED lights work great at -20. I have five outside and they've been there for a couple years.

Joined: Nov 2007
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KJay Offline OP
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Originally Posted by twh
LED lights work great at -20. I have five outside and they've been there for a couple years.


During the winter when snow and ice accumulates on the outside light fixtures and flood lights, do the LEDís actually generate enough heat to melt it off like incandescent bulbs do?
They had this problem with LED traffic lights and the solution was to add small heating elements to the lights.

Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 367
M
Member
I just found that the colour rendering on CFL bulbs is off.

I am trying a new CFL bulb in the bedroom starting yesterday afternoon, and now I find that while my socks match in the bedroom they are two different shades of blue in natural lite.

I either have to match socks in the kitchen or try a different brand of CFL so see if the colours match after I get dressed.

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