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Joined: Jul 2004
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G
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When I was in the BICSI class the mantra was to install the best cable you could find because the labor is the expensive part and nobody ever complained that their network was too fast.


Greg Fretwell
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Joined: Mar 2005
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G
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OK, too harsh maybe. But he asked specifically about 6A and I see a lot of arguments here about coiling, bundling, lazy s's etc. 6A is a protocol requiring the cable to be constructed and installed to combat ANEXT- Alien near end cross talk- or cross talk originating from an unknown source rather than in the individual cable itself which is simply called NEXT. Bundling and coiling where the cables are in close proximity to each other for long distances increases ANEXT and CAT6A cable should not be installed in this manner. Loose runs laying in a tray is the suggested installation method.
Thats what I meant by knowing what the questions are.

Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 404
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I'm not too familiar with the specs of 6a, but you definitely want to put in at least 6 these days... Although 5e/6 will handle 1Gbps just fine, if your client makes a jump to 10Gbps they'll be SOL unless they are all short runs. Take a look at the cost vs. the expected life of the installation.

I didn't really think much about the minute differences in shielding and twist between 5/5e/6 until the last building I worked with data in upgraded their switches to 1Gbps. Fortunately, our campus had all Cat6 (opened 2000/2001) in the walls but we found out which patch cables weren't up to snuff almost immediately. My "copper is copper" theory was shot to hell as we had to track down and replace all kinds of Cat5 buried under furniture. There was another building in the district that wasn't too much older (opened 1999) that had been done with Cat5 and they had to do a whole building rewire. Messy. I didn't even realize they had Cat6 in 2000, since I'm pretty sure that 5e was not even a published standard then.

Joined: Mar 2004
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twh Offline
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For the original post, it should be mentioned that data cable must be secured only with velcro - on sale at your local data store.

Joined: Jan 2004
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Merlin Offline OP
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Thanks for all the great info, gentlemen. I am an electrician, however from time to time, I install the data cables at the same time. This application happens to be for a good customer of mine. I have also worked eith the network guy several times. He just isn't into installation of the cableing. He only does set-up and programming. Therefore, I will be installing and terminating.

We did chose to use Cat6 as it is more readily available and sufficient for this application.

TWH, what does the velcro have to do with anything? No cable ties?? Even losely?

Thanks again guys!!


Joined: Jan 2011
Posts: 64
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1) I have a 100' cat 5E run running my computer, and it is faster than wireless.

2) My high school was wired with cat 6 back in late 1990's/early 2000's. SCHUYLKILL COUNTY!!!

3) Why velcro? I thought that is elininated by twisting the conductors.

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twh Offline
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Of course, you can use loose cable ties. You can also lay the cables on the ceiling tiles, or whatever. It will all work. But, next year when another electrician sticks his head in the ceiling, he'll tell the customer that you messed up by using ties. Then, he'll tell the customer that you're sloppy because you didn't tighten the cable ties.

I recommend a termination tool that punches everything at the same time. They're pricey, but well worth it.

We use pattern A for punching, unless the rest of the place is pattern B, or is that Cat5?

Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 404
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Doesn't matter if you use A or B as long as you do the same at both ends, otherwise you end up with a crossover cable.

Portions of my wired network aren't faster than wireless; at least, not 802.11b; I still have a bunch of devices on a 10Mbps segment because I can't bring myself to replace things that are still working just fine, even if a bit slower than today's standards. I have a 3Com 10Mbps hub that has a lifetime warranty! Although, if I ever had to make a claim on it (if they would even still honor it) they're most likely send me something a little more modern.

Joined: Jul 2004
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G
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The thought is that a cable tie crushes the pairs and changes the SWR. I know a kink will show up on a scope (TDR). If you create a sharp bend with the tie I am sure it will show up. Whether that actually changes performance is the wild card.

I am hard wired here on my home network and I get 100mz performance. I did weed out all of the 10mz boxes. You will do better if you swap out hubs for switches most of the time. I can have up to about 18 boxes on the network but usually there are only 7 or 8 turned on at any one time.


Greg Fretwell
Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 212
G
Member
Home networks do not require speeds greater than provided by Cat 5 and most of them don't even need that. Someday that might not be true and having better cable won't hurt but it's going to be a while before you recover the cost. It sounds like Greg has a network beyond that of the usual home user.
Noderaser, it is not correct that either the A or B protocol can be used wherever as long as both ends are the same. Proper test equipment can tell which has been used and except for rare exceptions, B is the common protocol. Using A will usually work but won't test. It's like saying that swapping the black and white in Romex will work just fine. It will, but it's not right and the next guy is going to be pissed.

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