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Range/oven disconnect #187685 07/07/09 02:04 PM
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 356
Niko Offline OP
Member
How many of you install a disconnect for a drop in range or a wall mounted oven? And if you are an inspector, do you require a disconnect for the above appliances?

Thanks for your comments.


Be kind to your neighbor, he knows where you live

Work Gear for Electricians and the Trades
Re: Range/oven disconnect [Re: Niko] #187686 07/07/09 02:08 PM
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 9,540
G
gfretwell Offline
Member
You need some kind of disconnect IMHO. Usually it is just a plug that is accessible behind a drawer or in a cabinet.


Greg Fretwell
Re: Range/oven disconnect [Re: gfretwell] #187687 07/07/09 02:16 PM
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 356
Niko Offline OP
Member
Usually the drop in range and the wall mounted oven are hard wired. and according to 422(31)(B) if the appliance is more than 300VA then the OCPD be within site or be locking type or the appliance have a local disconnect.



Be kind to your neighbor, he knows where you live

Re: Range/oven disconnect [Re: Niko] #187688 07/07/09 02:56 PM
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 7,215
HotLine1 Offline
Member
Either a receptacle for the appliance, or a breaker lock-off; non-removable.

Two choices.


John
Re: Range/oven disconnect [Re: HotLine1] #187692 07/07/09 03:22 PM
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 763
K
KJay Offline
Member
Usually, if there's an OFF/Clear button on the touch pad, the inspector's around here will let it go, even though I don't think this really complies with 422.34.
The breaker lock-off sounds like the best option, but most likely will never even get used.

Re: Range/oven disconnect [Re: KJay] #187694 07/07/09 04:05 PM
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 356
Niko Offline OP
Member
I was reading the code and came across this code section. and i thought that I have never been cited for not having a disconnect within site for hardwired appliances.
And i wondered what you guys do? turn down the final for not having a disconnect?

Thanks.


Be kind to your neighbor, he knows where you live

Re: Range/oven disconnect [Re: Niko] #187696 07/07/09 04:45 PM
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 9,540
G
gfretwell Offline
Member
I would not consider any button on a touch pad to be a disconnect, no matter what the they decided to label it.
The power is still going to the control board inside the appliance. These things usually have a solid state relay controlling the power and that can easily leak enough current to kill you without ever exhibiting any kind of fault to the user.
I really like a real disconnect device on the wall or a plug so you can pull the cooking appliance without any power in the pigtail or anywhere inside. In these kinds of things, a fault in the pigtail or connector is as dangerous as anything else. You certainly do not want to be holding that oven when the loose wire energizes the case. If you are lucky it just shorts, pops, trips the breaker and you drop the oven on your foot. wink


Greg Fretwell
Re: Range/oven disconnect [Re: gfretwell] #187697 07/07/09 04:50 PM
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 9,540
G
gfretwell Offline
Member
BTW this disconnect thing seems to be far from as universal as I thought it was. Here in Florida, inspectors are very particular about disconnects and even the working space around SOME of them. (a difference I have been hard pressed to define).
In Md, not so much.
https://www.electrical-contractor.n.../187659/Maryland_HVAC_Install#Post187659


Greg Fretwell
Re: Range/oven disconnect [Re: gfretwell] #187707 07/07/09 09:07 PM
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 7,215
HotLine1 Offline
Member
Niko:
I have written quite a few red stickers for non-conformance; as I said above...two choices, receptacle or breaker lock-out.

A few guys can't seem to understand that the CB lock-out is NOT the clip type to prevent inadvertent shut down of select circuits. Nor is it a LOTO device, it has to remain on the CB, not removable. A recent final on a McMansion took three (3) trys 'till the right item was installed.



John
Re: Range/oven disconnect [Re: gfretwell] #187708 07/07/09 09:07 PM
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 745
E
EV607797 Offline
Member
I have never heard of anything more than a plug/cord connection as being the required means for disconnecting any appliance. I can see the value in having a breaker handle lock on a hardwired oven or cook top (though I still disagree). There comes a point in time where the NEC cannot protect the stupid from their own stupidity.

In a typical home, if the husband (or wife) is making a repair to a cook top, wouldn't it be safe to assume that everyone in the house is probably aware? How much of a risk is there that the husband gets electrocuted because the wife haphazardly goes and turns on the breaker? (Well, in my house, I could see that happening intentionally but that is another subject). blink

While I'm having an Andy Rooney moment, how come shared neutral/grounds, hard-wired ranges and dryers, along with no disconnects have been perfectly acceptable for decades, then ten years ago they suddenly became dangerous?

The range in my house is now on a 4-wire circuit, but only because it is connected to a generator sub-panel. It was originally on a 6/3 AL SEU cable. My dryer is still on 8/3 AL SEU since the house was built in 1992. Me thinks that someone out there is getting a bit too carried away with potential risks. Are there really any documented cases of injury or death being caused by the lack of these recent requirements that exceed those of other electrical injuries? Nope.

I know, I know......Lead paint, driving without seat belts, smoking, riding bikes without helmets, asbestos, etc. weren't discovered until the damage was done, but come on.

Sounds like manufacturers of 4-wire cords, receptacles, disconnects and handle locks are constantly busy at work in changing the code (A.K.A: Reinventing the wheel).

Personally, I feel that the 4-wire requirement is actually making things more dangerous, since DIY's and appliance delivery boys aren't making sure to keep the neutral and ground separate. In my travels, I often find (even in new homes) that the bonding strap has been left in-place or removed in the incorrect scenarios. bash


---Ed---

"But the guy at Home Depot said it would work."
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