ECN Electrical Forum - Discussion Forums for Electricians, Inspectors and Related Professionals
ECN Shout Chat
Top Posters(30 Days)
sparky 4
Recent Posts
Dimmable LED 2x4 lay in fixtures
by gfretwell. 12/13/17 09:49 PM
2017 NEC Changes
by sparky. 12/13/17 06:57 PM
Casino Wiring methods
by HotLine1. 12/09/17 10:44 AM
Ground wire Size to water Line.
by HotLine1. 12/05/17 12:11 PM
Flexible conduit to an outside Spa
by gfretwell. 12/05/17 12:28 AM
New in the Gallery:
Gallery Test
Popular Topics(Views)
243,039 Are you busy
179,470 Re: Forum
170,398 Need opinion
Who's Online Now
0 registered members (), 24 guests, and 10 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Rate This Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2
#170944 - 11/15/07 05:06 PM Can You Identify This?  
Admin  Offline

Administrator
Member
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 3,460
NY, USA
Can Anyone identify this?

submitted by:
Michael Thomas
Paragon Home Inspection, LLC

[Linked Image]


Tools for Electricians:

#170945 - 11/15/07 05:19 PM Re: Can You Identify This? [Re: Admin]  
P38J  Offline
Junior Member
Joined: Jan 2007
Posts: 8
Arlington, WA.
If I'm not mistaken, that is called a "rate of rise" used in fire alarms. Senses when the air temp rises too fast and trips the alarm. Or burns a element on the inside and trips. I've seen them but never actually taken them apart to see what makes em tick.
Jerry


#170973 - 11/16/07 01:46 AM Re: Can You Identify This? [Re: P38J]  
noderaser  Offline
Member
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 404
Portland, Oregon, United State...
AFAIK, they were used a lot in commercial installations in the late 50's and early 60's.


#176038 - 03/18/08 07:22 PM Re: Can You Identify This? [Re: noderaser]  
harold endean  Offline
Member
Joined: Feb 2002
Posts: 2,233
Boonton, NJ
I have seen them and I have installed them They are "Rate Of Rise" heat detectors. They could also be "Fixed Temp" heat detectors. You would use a fixed temp in the attic, because a Rate of rise, might go off on a hot summer day. They replaced another type of fire detectors. ( I wish I had pictures of them.) The older types of fire alarms relied on copper piping filled with air. The "Heat Sensor" was a bigger copper tube connected to the smaller piping. This whole piping system was pressurized. If there was a fire, the pressure would build up in the pipes and set off the fire alarm system. They were very difficult to trouble shoot if you got a leak. You would have to walk around the whole building with soapy bubble water. You would spray the bubble water onto the copper pipes and look for leaks.


#176045 - 03/18/08 09:10 PM Re: Can You Identify This? [Re: harold endean]  
leland  Offline
Member
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 853
Lowell area, Ma. USA
AFAIK-- Excuse my ignorance. But what the heck does this mean? I see it every where and feel 'so outa the loop'.

"Rate of rise"- heat detectors need to see a certain rise in temp with in a few seconds. Say 20 deg in 20 sec.
"Fixed temp"- heats need to reach the desired temp before activating.
And the new ones- 1980 and beyond= are combo if so desired.

HID- (wording escapes me now- sorry)-"The older types of fire alarms relied on copper piping filled with air. The "Heat Sensor" was a bigger copper tube connected to the smaller piping. This whole piping system was pressurized. If there was a fire, the pressure would build up in the pipes and set off the fire alarm system. They were very difficult to trouble shoot if you got a leak. You would have to walk around the whole building with soapy bubble water. You would spray the bubble water onto the copper pipes and look for leaks."

Harold, your correct. these are very good. But. only filled with Ambient air. when heated the air pressure rises closing the ckt. Or pessurizing the solonoid.

Still VERY common in special hazard fire Suppression applications. Where no electrical current would be acceptable..
Flamable storage etc.



#176065 - 03/19/08 10:02 AM Re: Can You Identify This? [Re: leland]  
Retired_Helper  Offline
Member
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 165
Maine
Originally Posted by leland
AFAIK-- Excuse my ignorance. But what the heck does this mean? I see it every where and feel 'so outa the loop'.

AFAIK = As Far As I Know. Don't feel badly. I'm still scratching my head over IIRC. grin


#176068 - 03/19/08 10:07 AM Re: Can You Identify This? [Re: Retired_Helper]  
n1ist  Offline
Member
Joined: Feb 2002
Posts: 183
Malden MA
If I Remember Correctly...


#176074 - 03/19/08 02:24 PM Re: Can You Identify This? [Re: n1ist]  
Retired_Helper  Offline
Member
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 165
Maine
Originally Posted by n1ist
If I Remember Correctly...


You know, I thought of that, after I posted. That's the story of my life, great ideas that come too late. Thanks for your confirmation. smile

How's Malden, by the way? I lived there, at that big complex on the Hill, Kennedy Drive, back in 1999.

Last edited by Retired_Helper; 03/19/08 02:26 PM. Reason: had to mention Malden

#176577 - 04/06/08 04:09 PM Re: Can You Identify This? [Re: Retired_Helper]  
jes  Offline
Member
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 103
CT
The device is known as a 'Fyrindex' thermostat and was made in both fixed temperature and rate-of-rise versions. At some point in the life of the product is was made by the Kidde Corporation. They are no longer produced.


#176647 - 04/08/08 03:22 PM Re: Can You Identify This? [Re: jes]  
wa2ise  Offline
Member
Joined: Nov 2002
Posts: 784
Oradell NJ USA
Those were common in college dorms, back in the mid 1970s. In the halls and sometimes in each room. Some also had scorch marks from idiot prankster students holding cigarette lighters near them, seeing if they could be set off...


Page 1 of 2 1 2

Member Spotlight
Alan Belson
Alan Belson
Mayenne N. France
Posts: 1,803
Joined: March 2005
Show All Member Profiles 
Featured:

2017 Master Electrician Exam Preparation Combos
2017 NEC Electrician
Exam Prep Combos:
Master / Journeyman

 

Shout Box
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.0
Page Time: 0.017s Queries: 16 (0.003s) Memory: 0.8204 MB (Peak: 1.0002 MB) Zlib enabled. Server Time: 2017-12-14 12:54:04 UTC