ECN Electrical Forum - Discussion Forums for Electricians, Inspectors and Related Professionals
ECN Shout Chat
ShoutChat
Recent Posts
Where is Everyone?
by luckyshadow - 11/21/21 10:14 AM
It's been an interesting career
by The Watt Doctor - 11/19/21 09:56 AM
Well I am back to stay (nearly 6 years)
by The Watt Doctor - 11/19/21 09:17 AM
Motor Load Relationships Between Fans and Pumps
by The Watt Doctor - 11/18/21 09:24 AM
GFCI's pops in large numbers
by dsk - 11/05/21 06:45 AM
New in the Gallery:
240/208 to a house
240/208 to a house
by wa2ise, October 9
Now you know.
Now you know.
by Tom_Horne, September 7
Who's Online Now
0 members (), 50 guests, and 19 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Rate Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2
#151369 12/13/06 11:00 AM
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 55
B
Big Ed Offline OP
Member
We follow 70E at our facility. Following a recent training session on arc flash and electrical safety I realized that we aren't "completely" following 70E, and some changes to our procedures need to be made.

What I am running into is management that wants proof that OSHA stands behind the tennants of 70E.

The only thing that I have been able to find is a reference in 1910 subpart S saying that OSHA refereces 70E. Does that mean that they enforce it as well?

Arc Flash PPE Clothing, LOTO & Insulated Tools
#151370 12/13/06 11:04 AM
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,391
I
Moderator
It is my understanding that at this moment OSHA can not fine you for non-compliance with 70E.

But if there is an accident 70E can be used against the company.


Bob Badger
Construction & Maintenance Electrician
Massachusetts
#151371 12/13/06 10:43 PM
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 9,672
Likes: 7
G
Member
As far as I know this is just a standard like NFPA 70 and it doesn't mean diddly unless it is adopted by the local/state government.
I don't think the federal government accepts other people's standards. They have 535 folks in DC who write that kind of thing themselves and they don't like outsiders encroaching on their turf.


Greg Fretwell
#151372 12/14/06 04:08 PM
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 58
Y
Member
At our training sesion on 70-E we were told exactly what iwire stated. 70-E kicks in when the s^#t hits the fan.

#151373 12/14/06 04:40 PM
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 12
R
Member
Since none of us are lawyers, you may want your managers to have the corporate attorneys read and interpret Part 1910, Subparts 1910.5 and 1910.6 to determine “Applicability of standards” and “Incorporation by reference.”

#151374 12/14/06 06:26 PM
Joined: Nov 2000
Posts: 2,148
R
Member
Quote
I don't think the federal government accepts other people's standards. They have 535 folks in DC who write that kind of thing themselves and they don't like outsiders encroaching on their turf.
Actually the original 70E was developed by the NFPA upon the request of OSHA.
Don


Don(resqcapt19)
#151375 12/14/06 08:49 PM
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 9,672
Likes: 7
G
Member
I would be curious what the force of law is if it isn't actually passed by congress.
Anything goes until it gets ruled on in court I guess.


Greg Fretwell
#151376 12/18/06 09:38 AM
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 120
Z
Zog Offline
Member
OSHA dosent really write the standards, they take industry standards like the NFPA 70E, change the wording to make it enforcable, and publish it as an OSHA standard.

The upcoming release of the new OSHA electrical standard is based on the 2004 NFPA 70E. The person who was the chairman of the 70E commitee now works for OSHA, probally to help with the release of enforcement of the new proposed standard.

Big Ed, there is a video on the internet of David Wallace from OSHA discussing OSHA's viewpoint of enforcement and compliance of the 70E, you should be able to find this video with a quick google search.


MV/HV Testing Specialist, "BKRMAN"
#151377 12/19/06 10:56 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 376
F
Member
NFPA 70E Standard for the Electrical Safety Requirements for Employee Workplaces
http://www.mt-online.com/articles/100470e.cfm

#151378 12/22/06 12:41 AM
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 11
J
Member
NFPA 70E is incorporated into OSHA by reference. In the event of an incident OSHA would typically cite you under the General Duty Clause. i.e. the employer has a responsibility to provide a workplace free from recognized hazards.

There was an initiative to re-write the 1910 and 1926 electrical standards but this has been put on hold and they are focusing on 1926 Sub Part V and 1910.269 High Voltage standards.


Jim Humphrey
Page 1 of 2 1 2

Link Copied to Clipboard
Featured:

Tools for Electricians
Tools for Electricians
 

* * * * * * *

2020 Master Electrician Exam Preparation Combos
2020 NEC Electrician
Exam Prep Combos:
Master / Journeyman

 

Member Spotlight
Admin
Admin
NY, USA
Posts: 3,669
Joined: October 2000
Top Posters(30 Days)
Admin 3
Popular Topics(Views)
286,194 Are you busy
218,639 Re: Forum
204,830 Need opinion
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5