ECN Electrical Forum - Discussion Forums for Electricians, Inspectors and Related Professionals
ECN Shout Chat
ShoutChat
Recent Posts
Where is Everyone?
by gfretwell - 06/20/21 10:53 PM
Happy Father's Day!
by Bill Addiss - 06/19/21 04:16 PM
A Risky Setup
by timmp - 06/18/21 08:08 PM
Conduit over Vinyl Siding
by Jim M - 06/16/21 08:30 PM
Updated Forum Software
by Admin - 06/15/21 10:23 AM
New in the Gallery:
2020 - 2021 Winter Project
2020 - 2021 Winter Project
by Bill Addiss, April 29
Garden 2021
Garden 2021
by Bill Addiss, April 26
Who's Online Now
1 members (Scott35), 13 guests, and 15 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Rate Thread
#141979 11/17/04 07:02 PM
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,407
Trumpy Offline OP
Member
Hi there Guys,
The Electrical Code of Practice for the Electrical Wiring Work in Domestic Premises has just been updated from the old 1993 edition.
To view this document as a PDF file, click on this link.
The file size is 1783KB.
I'd invite your comments on this document, especially the way that it's been written.
The original document was a pretty dry sort of a thing, with few diagrams, but this new one seems to look a bit more "Consumer-Friendly".
And it's got details on the new RCD and Recessed Lighting requirements here. [Linked Image]

#141980 11/17/04 08:11 PM
Joined: May 2002
Posts: 381
H
Member
I haven't gone through it in detail Mike but what a sensible document - I like it. With a few alterations to the types of sockets it would be very applicable to the South African setting though there is a lot more conduit work over there.

Is Oz going to go this route or are they still very restrictive on what a non-licenced person can do?


[This message has been edited by Hutch (edited 11-17-2004).]

#141981 11/20/04 05:36 PM
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,407
Trumpy Offline OP
Member
I had a chance last night to have a decent read through this document and it looks like there was a lot of thought and consultation put into it.
It also makes it plainly obvious, what the limits of work are to the Homeowner, with regard to getting the work certified and connected.
But, there are a few little points in this Code that I found a tad concerning:
In the Foreword was this statement;
Quote
To increase your skills in electrical work, there are training courses available at your local polytechnic, through your Community educational services or Marae.
As far as I'm aware, I've never heard of such training existing, apart from the usual Electrical tradeskills course, but these run for a whole year.
Also, 1.4 gives a list of tools needed for the installation work, at the top of the list is:
Quote
A cutter for stripping wire (eg. wire strippers or a pocket knife)
Personally I don't really like the idea of people using knives to strip cables and wires, sure I don't have a problem with Electricians doing it, they are more likely to know when they've damaged a wire by nicking it.
1.5.2 allows the use of Socket type RCD's.
When this whole RCD regulation thing was first released as part of the AS/NZS 3000 Wiring laws, we were told that the only type of RCD you were allowed to install in new installations was the Switchboard mounted type.
3.7.2 could lead to mis-interpretation over the burying of TPS cables without conduit.
One thing that I did find impressive with this Code is the quality of the diagrams, in particular, Figure 4, 2 Way lighting circuits, is drawn and labelled in a really simple and easy to read way.
Finally, 3.5.1 states this:
Quote
Do not run cables on purlins near roofing
While this may seem like common sense to you and I, there was an incident over here in 1995 that highlighted this.
In Rangiora, a 6-year old boy was fatally electrocuted when he touched the metal roofing iron while standing on a metal slide in the backyard.
Investigation found that a nail had pierced a 2-core lighting cable, between the P and N wires, but the Neutral insulation was still intact and there was insufficient current to blow the fuse on the circuit. [Linked Image]
Hutch,
This is a NZ only Code and also Australia uses different codes for every state I believe.

#141982 11/22/04 05:01 PM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,520
P
Member
I've just had a chance to browse through the document, and on the whole it does seem to offer reasonable advice.

Trivial points, but two items I hadn't realized before:

1. That modern TPC cable in NZ has the "active" conductor down the center with neutral and earth to the sides.

2. That the isolation switch for a cooking appliance only needs to be single-pole.

I notice in the appendices there are sketches of common fuse types, and the old rewireable MEM type is included. From the drawing, it looks exactly like the old MEM fuses installed in Britain by the thousand during the 1950s/60s.

The document is pretty clear about what the regulations allow, and don't allow, the homeowner to do, but as with the Part P being introduced in the U.K., how on earth can it be enforced?

If somebody runs a new circuit and wires it into the switchboard himself, for example, who's going to know?

#141983 11/24/04 03:32 AM
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,407
Trumpy Offline OP
Member
Paul,
The Phase wire being between the Earth and Neutral wires, has only been around for a couple of years, there was a reason for changing the sequence, but I can't for the life of me remember what it was!. [Linked Image]
The use of a single-pole range switch was mandated under the 1992 Regulations, given that 95% of all ranges are 1 Phase here these days, it saves the added expense of a 2 Pole switch, it also saves making another joint in the switch flushbox.
I personally like the idea of running the Neutral and Earth wires directly to the Range, without joins, means less resistance.
Quote
I notice in the appendices there are sketches of common fuse types, and the old rewireable MEM type is included. From the drawing, it looks exactly like the old MEM fuses installed in Britain by the thousand during the 1950s/60s.
I wouldn't doubt that it isn't exactly the same, as at that particular time, a lot of fusegear was imported here from England, much of it is still in use too and it will be around for some time as well.
It's going to come to a stage here, where a lot of houses of that era, are going to have to be re-wired as the wiring comes to the end of it's natural life.
We're starting to see the effects of this already, the local Fire Brigade here have extinguished 3 houses in the same street, that so I'm told, where built and wired within months of each other. [Linked Image]
Quote
If somebody runs a new circuit and wires it into the switchboard himself, for example, who's going to know?
I'd agree whole-heartedly with that statement Paul, there's probably a heap of work gone on around here that should have been tested and certified before it was connected up.
But on the other side of the coin, if I was not an Electrician, I would not be mucking around with the Electrical system in my house, mainly because I'd like to save my Insurance cover for where it's really needed. [Linked Image]

#141984 11/27/04 05:20 PM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,520
P
Member
Maybe the outlook in NZ is different, but here in Britain there is a strong DIY influence. People accept certain building restrictions as being necessary, albeit a grudging acceptance in this area where the local council's decisions make no sense to anybody.

But when it comes to working on anything inside their house, I'd say that the majority of people here do not like the idea of being told what they can or cannot do. Maybe it goes back to the old "Englishman's home is his castle" adage, but the idea of getting government approval to install a light, move a door, refurbish the bathroom, or even move the kitchen from one end of the house to the other is just totally alien to us.

Quote
The Phase wire being between the Earth and Neutral wires, has only been around for a couple of years, there was a reason for changing the sequence, but I can't for the life of me remember what it was!.
Could it be that if somebody were to drill into the side of the cable they will hit a conductor at (or very near to) earth potential first?

I've seen that proposed somewhere before, although personally I don't see it being that big a deal. The chances of drilling sideways into the cable seem much lower than hitting it face on, and besides, if it's a switch loop it will still have a live conductor on the outer edge anyway.

[This message has been edited by pauluk (edited 11-27-2004).]

#141985 11/29/04 06:47 AM
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,407
Trumpy Offline OP
Member
Paul,
I believe that the sequence came about here when we changed over to AS/NZS 3000:2001.
We are probably a wee bit different down here, as in sure, the average DIY'er might not touch thier wiring, but man, watch them tear 3 or 4 of the internal walls out from within their house, to make the lounge bigger!. [Linked Image]

#141986 01/01/05 09:30 PM
Joined: Mar 2003
Posts: 52
D
Member
Australia still has laws which prevent unlicensed people from performing electrical work.
I think rightly so when you see some of the botched work performed by licensed people.

I am not sure I would like have a home wired by someone without proper training.

Some electricians don't see the importance in testing their work and they should know better. The only test a homeowner would probably do and understand would be to plug something in and see if it works.

Regards
Gray

[This message has been edited by Dapo (edited 01-01-2005).]

#141987 01/01/05 10:26 PM
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,407
Trumpy Offline OP
Member
Hi there Gray,
Happy New Year, mate!. [Linked Image]
Quote
Some electricians don't see the importance in testing their work and they should know better.
I couldn't agree more and would also like to add, that with a system like Self-Certification, completing a Certificate of Compliance after finishing a job that hasn't been properly tested, if at all, opens the Electrical Worker up to all sorts of nasty Legal ramifications.
Personally, I have no sympathy at all for those that get caught like this.
It's part of an Electrician's training to learn to test Electrical Installations and it's not put in there just for the fun of it. [Linked Image]


Link Copied to Clipboard
Featured:

Tools for Electricians
Tools for Electricians
 

* * * * * * *

2020 Master Electrician Exam Preparation Combos
2020 NEC Electrician
Exam Prep Combos:
Master / Journeyman

 

Member Spotlight
MarkC10
MarkC10
CA, Inland Empire
Posts: 43
Joined: September 2013
Top Posters(30 Days)
Admin 10
Trumpy 8
Popular Topics(Views)
280,460 Are you busy
213,547 Re: Forum
200,418 Need opinion
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5