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#139451 11/08/03 07:15 AM
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,407
Trumpy Offline OP
Member
With Ragnar posting the topic of NYIF cable.
This has got me thinking, just how many cable codes are there out there, that some of of us have no idea what they mean.
Some of the US ones are a wee-bit mysterious too!. [Linked Image]
Please feel free to post all of the cable designations that you can think of, US or otherwise!. [Linked Image]

#139452 11/08/03 07:29 AM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,520
P
Member
This is certainly one area where a variety of systems are in use. CENELEC decided to introduce a "harmonized" coding system for Europe, so that's added yet another system to the list!

[Linked Image]

Quote
European "Harmonised" Cable Back to the top CENELEC publications HD-21 and HD-22 outline construction of PVC jacketed and rubber-jacketed cable respectively.

HD-21 recommendations for PVC jacketed cable:

H05VV-F…(rated 300/500V): Ordinary PVC sheathed flexible cable for use in offices, domestic premises, kitchens, for medium duties, i.e., washing machines, spin dryers, refrigerators. Permitted for cooking and heating appliances, providing that cable is not in contact with hot parts and is not subject to radiation, etc. (NOT suitable for outdoor use.)

HD-22 recommendations for rubber jacketed cable:

H05RN-F…(rated 300/500V): This is flexible rubber insulated cable intended for connecting lightweight hand and portable equipment subjected to low mechanical stresses in an open air environment, e.g., as connection leads for outdoor appliances, and in workshops. Not suited for use in agricultural applications or where there is risk of fire or explosion.

H07R-F…(rated 450/750V): This is flexible rubber insulated cable for products subjected to medium mechanical stresses in dry and damp places. Use as supply leads for transportable motors, appliances, hand-held lamps, electric tools and machines on building sites, in agricultural use, workshops, and utility water equipment. Permissible for installation on plaster and direct installation on structural parts of hoists and other heavy machines.

#139453 11/08/03 07:38 AM
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,407
Trumpy Offline OP
Member
Thanks for that Paul!.
Oddly enough all of our cables regardless of type and materials are required to be 600/1000V.
Is there such a thing as Heat-Resistant(90 degree) Flex in the UK?.

#139454 11/08/03 11:28 AM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,520
P
Member
Yes. It's used for connecting an immersion heater to its outlet box and in similar situations.

#139455 11/08/03 07:25 PM
Joined: Dec 2002
Posts: 1,250
D
djk Offline
Member
There's a really heavy version available for hooking up ovens here.

#139456 11/09/03 02:15 AM
Joined: Oct 2003
Posts: 147
C
Member
In Canada cable designations and there use are listed in table 11 (for flexible) and table 19 (for other than flexible). The designations don't follow a pattern like the cenelec harmonised system. However since there is probably alot of cross border trading, the designations in this table are probably similar too, if not, identicle to whats available in the states. Conditions of use might vary slightly.

#139457 11/09/03 02:18 AM
Joined: Oct 2003
Posts: 147
C
Member
As a side point, instead of using the term romex , we use the term loomex.

#139458 11/09/03 06:36 AM
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 2,492
T
Member
I think the first letter in the commonly used German cable designations refers to the outer sheath (i. e. either N for non-metallic or nothing at all), the following letters offer a further descriptions. YM is conduit wire, NYM is the very same stuff with an outer sheath, NYIF is the famous "zip Romex". YE is conduit grounding wire. For flexible cords most people seem to use the international designations, but here in Austria there's one exception. YZWL is zip cord. (ZWL standing for Zwillingsleitung, twin cord). That's about all I know about those designations. Yeah, and a suffix -J or -O refers to with or without grounding conductor.

#139459 11/09/03 07:58 AM
Joined: Dec 2002
Posts: 1,250
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djk Offline
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Zip cord's something which you never really see around here anymore. It used to be quite common place on things like clocks with crimped on Europlugs back in the late 1970s and even on audio equipment.

It's something I've only seen on US appliences in recent years.

#139460 11/09/03 10:24 AM
Joined: Oct 2002
Posts: 177
B
Member
I wonder if there is any country using the new "harmonised" CENELEC coding system? By using it, I mean when you go to by a cable will any electrician use the Harmonised term (H05VV-F....) or the national term?

[This message has been edited by Belgian (edited 11-09-2003).]

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