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#12748 08/15/02 01:16 PM
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 21
J
JBN1611 Offline OP
Member
Ok question. Can you just get an Associates Degree in Electrical Engineering? If so, what can you use it for?

#12749 08/15/02 06:54 PM
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 680
W
Member
At UMaine one can get a 2 yr(also a 4 year) degree in Electrical Eng. Technology. I'd assume its available other places. Engineering Technology is more hands on than Theoritical(sp?). I'd say its usefull for development of factory equipment, components, maintenance and other hands on type stuff.

#12750 08/15/02 08:46 PM
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 53
C
Member
Walrus,

The 2 year EET degree @ UMaine was discontinued 5 or so years ago. All degrees from the School of Engineering Technology are now 4 years.

Joe '99 UMaine

#12751 08/15/02 09:00 PM
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 300
M
Member
You can get an associates in engineering technology at several schools, even community colleges. And some will let you "specialize" in electrical. But it's not an engineering degree.

The eng-tech degrees are more practical application and much less math and theory.

These are often offered under "construction management" or something similar. It would be a method of entry as a mechanic at a factory, or as a clerk of the works or something similar in a construction company.

#12752 08/15/02 09:25 PM
Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 218
S
Member
My degree is an A.A.S. IN Electronics Tech. It was a combination of light theory and hands-on. It is used by most of our industries as what they are looking for in their electricians. We do wiring, PLC, and troubleshooting. It is generally the highest level of electricians in the maintenance dept.

#12753 08/16/02 02:16 AM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 545
A
Member
To be a top dog electrical engineer, you need a 4 year Bachelors degree. Big companies usually look at that ticket.


The Golden Rule - "The man with the gold makes the rule"

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