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Does the NEC permit this? #120927 05/25/05 03:19 PM
Joined: Oct 2000
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This cord cap is being secured with something that is not familiar? Does the NEC permit this? The machine dispenses phone cards in an airport.

Joe Tedesco
[Linked Image]

Tools for Electricians:
Re: Does the NEC permit this? #120928 05/25/05 06:52 PM
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BElder Offline
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2004 Cal.EC 400.10 Flexible cords and cables shall be connected to devices and to fittings so that tension is not transmitted to joints or terminals. Which I believe is refering more to connection to the appliances etc... But does this FPN cover this application. FPN Some methods of preventing pull on a cord from being transmitted to joints or terminals are knotting of the cord, winding with tape, and FITTINGS designed for the purpose.

Re: Does the NEC permit this? #120929 05/25/05 07:52 PM
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NumberSix Offline
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I don't like it simply because you can't unplug it.

If they wanted it hard-wired, shouldn't it have a disconnect instead of this engineered marvel?

Re: Does the NEC permit this? #120930 05/25/05 09:10 PM
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mamills Offline
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Silly me...I thought that's what twistlocks were for...? [Linked Image]

Mike (mamills)

Re: Does the NEC permit this? #120931 05/25/05 11:12 PM
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renosteinke Offline
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It's been awile since I've seen these- and personally, I think that the idea has some merit.

Growing up, we were always told of how fires start because plugs get only partly pulled out, and then get hot. This device is one way to reduce this risk.

The ones I remember were flexible enough that you could bend them out of the way if you wanted to unplug something, but did a decent job of keeping the plug in the socket. The only "downside" was that, with the advent of the three-prong plug, right angle plugs, etc., the things often just didn't fit.

I a perverse way, the use of these things might almost be required by the UL listing- of the alarm system. I wouldn't be surprised if security comes running if this machine gets unplugged- and UL's alarm folks really frown on false alarms.

Re: Does the NEC permit this? #120932 05/25/05 11:23 PM
Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 4,283
electure Offline
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That looks a heck of a lot like an extension cord to me. Is it, Joe?

I don't think that 422.33 would allow this if it were meant to be used as the disconnecting means.

It looks like a good tug on the cord might pull off the whole face of the receptacle and both the metal and plastic plates with it [Linked Image]

Re: Does the NEC permit this? #120933 05/26/05 12:40 AM
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SolarPowered Offline
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It would appear that one could fairly easily remove the plug from the receptacle. I would say that it's not really secured in place, but rather is guarded from accidental disconnection.

As Mike said, I don't see that it does anything that's much different from a Twist-Lock(R).

Re: Does the NEC permit this? #120934 05/26/05 06:26 AM
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Steve Miller Offline
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Let me ask the big question ... does this come as a unit (faceplate and keeper) or do we drill and tap the plate? If it comes as a unit, is it approved? If so, we have no argument (no legality argument); if not we have a violation in the modification of the plate.
That's my 2 cents worth.

Re: Does the NEC permit this? #120935 05/26/05 06:37 AM
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Alan Belson Offline
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If you look carefully, the retainer is a 3 sided box fixed with screws set diagonally, so it will be a lot more rigid than appears at first glance.
Alan


Wood work but can't!
Re: Does the NEC permit this? #120936 05/26/05 06:38 AM
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 2,749
Joe Tedesco Offline
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I don't think it was an extension cord. I will check when I get home on Sunday.

The first comment about the twist lock seemed to be made, because it would not require this type of setup.

The outer cover was added on the top of the existing cover, so if this cord was pulled away the entire assembly would be damaged!

I will add a closeup later.


Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant
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