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Re: Old Electrical Parts #103369 07/20/02 05:12 PM
Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 745
M
mamills Offline
Member
Circuit Man:

Looked at it a little while ago. This is a fascinating website!! Thanks for putting me onto it. [Linked Image]

Does anyone have any pix or know of any websites which deal with vintage fuse boxes or circuit breaker panels?

Mike (mamills)

[This message has been edited by mamills (edited 07-20-2002).]

2017 / 2014 NEC & Related Books and Study Guides
Re: Old Electrical Parts #103370 07/20/02 07:37 PM
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 2,527
B
Bjarney Offline
Moderator
There are a few searching at memory.loc.gov

Re: Old Electrical Parts #103371 07/21/02 07:34 AM
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 2,459
T
Texas_Ranger Offline
Member
Please don't tell me the two brass screws on the white receptacle were the terminal screws!
Was this 120 volts?

Re: Old Electrical Parts #103372 07/21/02 12:58 PM
Joined: Feb 2002
Posts: 2,233
H
harold endean Offline
Member
Texas ranger,

Yes, as a matter of fact those 2 screw terminals were used to connect 110 volt wiring to that white receptacle. It came from a very old wiring system here in the east coast.

Caper

Re: Old Electrical Parts #103373 07/21/02 03:36 PM
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 597
E
ElectricAL Offline
Member
[Linked Image]
The label reads: "GEM" Sectional Switch Box--Patented April 2, 1907, March 1, 1910, February 13, 1912. Type "F" 2 1/4" Deep, beveled corners, knock-outs for loom, approved by the underwriters, takes all makes of switches and receptacles. Chicago Fuse Mfg. Co. sole manufacturers, Chicago, New York.

[Linked Image]
The label reads: Single H & H Struck Up Push Switch Plate, Old Brass, Std. Pkg. is Plates for 100 Switches

[Linked Image]
4401, N Trade Mark, 10 Ampere Single Pole Nutmeg Push Switch, Std. Pkg. 100, Patented Nov.1, 1916, N. E. C. Standard Ratings, 10 Amp. 120 Volt, 5 Amp. 240 Volt.

The packaging of the old stuff is interesting, too. It's very heavy box board, by today's standards. This was found in an 1880's house in West St. Paul (which is immediately south of downtown. . .no kidding). The first electrification of the structure happened in the 1920's, and the installer left his "trash" between the joists of the second floor floor.

Al


Al Hildenbrand
Re: Old Electrical Parts #103374 07/21/02 07:59 PM
Joined: Feb 2002
Posts: 2,233
H
harold endean Offline
Member
Joe,
What did ElectricAL talk about? He has one I never heard of? Knockout parts for loom? What is that? Did I send you the picture of LOOM? If not I will send it in the next batch.

Caper

Re: Old Electrical Parts #103375 07/21/02 09:26 PM
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 597
E
ElectricAL Offline
Member
Caper,

[Linked Image]
This is the back of a 1920's bevel back gangable switch box. The steel is not galvanized, just painted black. The loom knock outs (the bottom two are the most visible) were intended to be punched into the box with something like a tack hammer.

[Linked Image]
A cotton binder from a coil of Loom.

[Linked Image]
This is hard to read, even when I have it in my hands. This photo is color shifted a bit from yellow to red to enhance the actual yellow ink (for Gold) on the old yellow of the box board. The box reads: 1 Roll, No. 8 Size, Gold Bond, Pure Rubber, Splicing Tape, Northwestern Electric Equipment Co., Jobbers of Electrical Supplies, 174-78 E. Sixth St., St. Paul, Minn.

[Linked Image]
A scrap of foil, or sheet, solder. Paste flux on a splice and crumple the solder around it, then apply heat. Viola! Flowed solder joint.

[This message has been edited by ElectricAL (edited 07-22-2002).]


Al Hildenbrand
Re: Old Electrical Parts #103376 07/22/02 08:08 AM
Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 745
M
mamills Offline
Member
Caper: Is the white receptacle (mentioned by Texas Ranger) a one-piece device, or are there two pieces - an edison base socket + a plug body?

Also, have you seen an edison base socket which mounts flush in a wall, inside a device box? An old church here (built in 1926, and only minimally rewired since that time) had (has?) a large number of these guys, each one protected by a nice brass plate with a little flap that lifts up to expose the socket for use. At the time, I believe this may have been the only way to connect portable cord-and-plug equipment to a source of power. I remember seeing an old electric heater that had a screw body wired to the end of it's power cord instead of the male connectors everyone knows today. Kinda odd, though...in a couple of locations, there were 30a plug fuses screwed into these wall sockets, and I don't think this was an attempt to keep little fingers from harm because the fuse element was still intact. [Linked Image]

Mike (mamills)

[This message has been edited by mamills (edited 07-22-2002).]

[This message has been edited by mamills (edited 07-22-2002).]

Re: Old Electrical Parts #103377 07/22/02 07:55 PM
Joined: Feb 2002
Posts: 2,233
H
harold endean Offline
Member
Mike,

That white receptacle is one piece. It would mount to the wall and your Knob and Tube wiring would attach to the brass screws. I haven't seen many of these installed, but I have only found the one. I have seen many,many of those old black boxes with the 2 holes for the loom. I have a picture of the loom which I will send in. As for the Edison based sockets that you mentioned, I haven't seen them either. I worked in northern NJ and many towns/cities have buildings 100-200 years old. Many still have the old wiring still in place and in use today.

Caper

Re: Old Electrical Parts #103378 07/22/02 08:46 PM
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 2,749
Joe Tedesco Offline OP
Member
[Linked Image]

Joe, These three pictures are of a piece of loom. Remember this stuff? (LOL)
Caper

Yes, and it is still available!

TUBING, FLEXIBLE NONMETALLIC(YCTR)

These listings include woven flexible nonmetallic tubing (fiber loom) in
trade sizes 7/32 to 2-1/2 in. incl. for installation as mechanical protection
in accordance with Articles 320 and 324 of the 1999 National Electrical Code.

The basic standard used to investigate products in this category is UL3,
Flexible Nonmetallic Tubing.

Joe


Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant
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