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#90317 - 11/14/04 11:21 PM Connecting Appliances with cords  
George Little  Offline
Member
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,489
Michigan USA
Article 422.16 talks to connecting appliances with cord and cap connections, including such things as built in ovens and cook tops. Am I to understand that unless the manufacturer specifically cautions against this approach that it would be code compliant to connect appliances with a cord? What about a steamer or other appliances not listed in 422?

[This message has been edited by George Little (edited 11-14-2004).]


George Little

2017 / 2014 NEC & Related Books and Study Guides

#90318 - 11/15/04 03:42 PM Re: Connecting Appliances with cords  
HotLine1  Online Content


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Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,799
Brick, NJ USA
George:
As I read 422.16, yes, if the item is specifically designed, electrically AND mechanically; and the appliance is identified/intended for flexible cord connection
(2002 NEC Handbook)

There is a lot of controversy with Atricle 400 (400.7 Allowed; 400.8 Not permitted)

John


John

#90319 - 11/15/04 09:45 PM Re: Connecting Appliances with cords  
George Little  Offline
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Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,489
Michigan USA
John, you've added your own spin on the quote from the handbook. Thats my point. If you can remove the appliance for repair readily is what the handbook says, then I can wire it with a cord. I doubt that you will find many ovens or cooktops that will say "Okay to connect with a cord". I would approve an electric appliance connected with a cord or even a gas appliance with a cord unless the directions said "Hard wirl only"


George Little

#90320 - 11/16/04 06:38 PM Re: Connecting Appliances with cords  
HotLine1  Online Content


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Brick, NJ USA
George:
Sorry, I did not type the text verbatum from the Handbook.
The point that I was attempting to make is like what you said...Hard wire only...no cord.

The controversy with 400.7 & 400.8 is that cord should not be used to "hardwire" an item.....not using cord with a cap.? correct??

John


John

#90321 - 11/16/04 08:39 PM Re: Connecting Appliances with cords  
Roger  Offline
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Joined: May 2002
Posts: 1,716
N.C.
George, I don't see any reason not to "Cord and Plug" connect these appliances.
Quote
If you can remove the appliance for repair readily is what the handbook says, then I can wire it with a cord.
Regardless of what the handbook says, can a disposal or a dishwasher be removed any more readily than a built in oven or cooktop?

As allowed in 422, these appliances are normally "Cord and Plug"
connected.

Roger

[This message has been edited by Roger (edited 11-16-2004).]


#90322 - 11/16/04 09:44 PM Re: Connecting Appliances with cords  
e57  Offline
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Joined: May 2003
Posts: 2,876
S.F.,CA USA
Quote
422.33 Disconnection of Cord-and-Plug-Connected Appliances.
(A) Separable Connector or an Attachment Plug and Receptacle. For cord-and-plug-connected appliances, an accessible separable connector or an accessible plug and receptacle shall be permitted to serve as the disconnecting means. Where the separable connector or plug and receptacle are not accessible, cord-and-plug-connected appliances shall be provided with disconnecting means in accordance with 422.31.
(B) Connection at the Rear Base of a Range. For cord-and-plug-connected household electric ranges, an attachment plug and receptacle connection at the rear base of a range, if it is accessible from the front by removal of a drawer, shall be considered as meeting the intent of 422.33(A).
(C) Rating. The rating of a receptacle or of a separable connector shall not be less than the rating of any appliance connected thereto.


I too don't see any reason not to cord connect, provided not excluded other-wise by manufacturer. So long as ratings and accessablity is complied with. Normally I will cord connect ranges and dishwashers in adjacent cabinets, cook-tops below. Ovens on the otherhand, it depends on the oven....


Mark Heller
"Well - I oughta....." -Jackie Gleason

#90323 - 11/16/04 10:44 PM Re: Connecting Appliances with cords  
George Little  Offline
Member
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,489
Michigan USA
If an appliance such as an oven or cooktop came with a whip, and a lot of them do, I would expect the appliance to be connected to a J-box and thus "hard wired". If the appliance came with no whip and it was easily disconnected from it's mount and other possible connections, I would have no problem approving a cord and cap type connection. I would not expect to qualify my approval based on a permission in the manufacturer's installation guide. On the other hand, if the instructions said "Do not cord connect" I would support that directive.


George Little

#90324 - 11/16/04 11:14 PM Re: Connecting Appliances with cords  
Roger  Offline
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Joined: May 2002
Posts: 1,716
N.C.
George, all due respect, I don't understand your post.

In the first part you say,
Quote
If an appliance such as an oven or cooktop came with a whip, and a lot of them do, I would expect the appliance to be connected to a J-box and thus "hard wired".


Now I must ask, where is it prohibited for us to change this?

Then you say,
Quote
I would not expect to qualify my approval based on a permission in the manufacturer's installation guide.


For an example, if I chose to order pre whipped fixtures for a project and one of these fixtures fixtures will not work as planed and is changed to hard pipe, would you red tag the installation?

As a matter of fact, we will order negotiated large frame panelboards with xxx breakers installed that we will remove and use on other jobs due to the fact we can buy these componets cheaper this way.

Now in your opinion, does removing a given I-Line breaker (for example) from a factory assembled panel mean the breaker or the panel can not be used or installed in any other wiring method that would be allowed per the NEC?

Roger

[This message has been edited by Roger (edited 11-16-2004).]


#90325 - 11/16/04 11:46 PM Re: Connecting Appliances with cords  
George Little  Offline
Member
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,489
Michigan USA
Roger, I was thinking of the situation where an appliance came with a whip containing high temperature insulation on the wires. I should have made that point clear. Sometimes when I post my remarks my thoughts don't quite make it from my brain down my arms to my finger tips [Linked Image]


George Little

#90326 - 11/17/04 01:00 AM Re: Connecting Appliances with cords  
e57  Offline
Member
Joined: May 2003
Posts: 2,876
S.F.,CA USA
quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If an appliance such as an oven or cooktop came with a whip, and a lot of them do, I would expect the appliance to be connected to a J-box and thus "hard wired".
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I also agree, and use that as reasoning not to cord connect.


Mark Heller
"Well - I oughta....." -Jackie Gleason


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