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#89973 - 10/26/04 09:21 AM Drip Pan Clearance
mustangelectric Offline
Member

Registered: 02/08/04
Posts: 496
Loc: Bentonville, AR
Hi,
Can anyone help figure out what the rules are regarding the distances drip pans have to be installed in front of electrical panels and equipment?

Is there a minimum or is it even required? This is from a sprinkler overhead..

I was thinking it was the depth of the panel?

thanks for any replies...

-regards

Mustang
_________________________
Electricity has no respect for ignorance!

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2014 / 2011 NEC & Related Books and Study Guides
#89974 - 10/26/04 09:29 AM Re: Drip Pan Clearance
Ryan_J Offline
Moderator

Registered: 08/19/03
Posts: 1355
Loc: West Jordan, Utah, USA
HAve you checked 110.26(F)?

Typically, if something is above the equipment, there is no height requirement along as you have the 6'6" headroom required by 110.26(A).
_________________________
Ryan Jackson,
Salt Lake City

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#89975 - 10/26/04 09:46 AM Re: Drip Pan Clearance
mustangelectric Offline
Member

Registered: 02/08/04
Posts: 496
Loc: Bentonville, AR
Hi,
thanks for the reply...I am looking in stallcups electrical design and it is showing that a metal water pipe passing through the 6' zone and is permitted as long as it is above the structural ceiling, whichever is one is lower...

110.26 (F) (1)?

110.26 (1) (A) EX.?

does this make sense?

do i still need a drip pan if the pipe is not in the zone? say it is above andfour feet away?

thanks for the replies..

-regards

mustang


[This message has been edited by mustangelectric (edited 10-26-2004).]

[This message has been edited by mustangelectric (edited 10-26-2004).]
_________________________
Electricity has no respect for ignorance!

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#89976 - 10/26/04 11:32 AM Re: Drip Pan Clearance
tdhorne Offline
Member

Registered: 03/22/01
Posts: 344
Loc: Maryland, USA
Section 122.26 (f) requires protection from condensation, leaks, or breaks from "foreign systems" located directly above electrical equipment but it forbids placing such "foreign systems" or the required leak protection apparatus within six feet of the top of the equipment or below the structural ceiling whichever is less.
--
Tom H

110.26 Spaces About Electrical Equipment.
Sufficient access and working space shall be provided and maintained about all electric equipment to permit ready and safe operation and maintenance of such equipment. Enclosures housing electrical apparatus that are controlled by lock and key shall be considered accessible to qualified persons.
(F) Dedicated Equipment Space. All switchboards, panelboards, distribution boards, and motor control centers shall be located in dedicated spaces and protected from damage.
Exception: Control equipment that by its very nature or because of other rules of the Code must be adjacent to or within sight of its operating machinery shall be permitted in those locations.
(1) Indoor. Indoor installations shall comply with 110.26(F)(1)(a) through (d).
(a) Dedicated Electrical Space. The space equal to the width and depth of the equipment and extending from the floor to a height of 1.8 m (6 ft) above the equipment or to the structural ceiling, whichever is lower, shall be dedicated to the electrical installation. No piping, ducts, leak protection apparatus, or other equipment foreign to the electrical installation shall be located in this zone.
Exception: Suspended ceilings with removable panels shall be permitted within the 1.8-m (6-ft) zone.
(b) Foreign Systems. The area above the dedicated space required by 110.26(F)(1)(a) shall be permitted to contain foreign systems, provided protection is installed to avoid damage to the electrical equipment from condensation, leaks, or breaks in such foreign systems.
(c) Sprinkler Protection. Sprinkler protection shall be permitted for the dedicated space where the piping complies with this section.
(d) Suspended Ceilings. A dropped, suspended, or similar ceiling that does not add strength to the building structure shall not be considered a structural ceiling.
_________________________
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous for general use" Thomas Alva Edison

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#89977 - 10/26/04 01:42 PM Re: Drip Pan Clearance
mustangelectric Offline
Member

Registered: 02/08/04
Posts: 496
Loc: Bentonville, AR
hi,
thanks for the reply. are you saying that the 6 feet is vertical or horizontal?

if there is a sprinkler system running through a electrical room within six feet horizontally and less than six feet vertically is a drip pan is required?

my 2002 nec does not have 122.26 is that reference correct?

thanks for the replies.

-regards

Mustang



[This message has been edited by mustangelectric (edited 10-26-2004).]
_________________________
Electricity has no respect for ignorance!

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#89978 - 10/26/04 03:22 PM Re: Drip Pan Clearance
tdhorne Offline
Member

Registered: 03/22/01
Posts: 344
Loc: Maryland, USA
Drip pans are only required if the "foreign system" is directly above the electrical equipment. Neither the "foreign system" nor the drip pans can be within six feet of the top of the equipment vertically or between the top of the electrical equipment and the structural ceiling whichever is less.
--
Tom H
_________________________
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous for general use" Thomas Alva Edison

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