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#87905 - 04/29/04 07:06 PM bathroom receptacles in "other than dwelling units"
sparkync Offline
Member

Registered: 10/17/02
Posts: 811
Loc: NC
I'm thinking that in any other establishement than dwelling units, that the bathroom receptacle circuit does not have to be on a separate circuit, but does have to be GFI protected. I cannot find the article that says any different. Am I right in this? I am to start on a church addition tomorrow, which will have some receptacles, and need to know. Also can anyone tell me what is the heigth of receptacles and switches for "handicapp bathrooms"? Thanks a lot
Steve.... By the way, I forgot to mention I'm talking North Carolina buiding code for the handicapp heigths. Thanks again..

[This message has been edited by sparkync (edited 04-29-2004).]

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#87906 - 04/29/04 07:10 PM Re: bathroom receptacles in "other than dwelling units"
Ryan_J Offline
Moderator

Registered: 08/19/03
Posts: 1355
Loc: West Jordan, Utah, USA
Hi Steve: NEC see 210.8(B) for the GFCI's. The residential section for circuiting bathrooms is 210.11(C), but it does not address commercial.

The ANSI A117.1 as sell as the ADAAG specify 15" to 48" for operable parts reach range for the disabled.
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Ryan Jackson,
Salt Lake City

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#87907 - 04/29/04 07:19 PM Re: bathroom receptacles in "other than dwelling units"
sparkync Offline
Member

Registered: 10/17/02
Posts: 811
Loc: NC
Ryan, am I understanding you right, that receptacles need to be at least 15" and that switches can't be over 48". And is this to center of box? Thanks again.. Steve

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#87908 - 04/29/04 07:22 PM Re: bathroom receptacles in "other than dwelling units"
Ryan_J Offline
Moderator

Registered: 08/19/03
Posts: 1355
Loc: West Jordan, Utah, USA
Hi Steve. BAsically thats right. The code(s) are refering to "operable parts", so I would view it as 1/2 of the duplex receptacle and at least the top of the switch in its highest position.

Also, be careful about the heights of other elements you might be installing, like thermostats, which will have the same regulations. I think we have some stuff on this at the "building codes" section, if it will help.


BTW: I hope I don't sound like an A$s, but the term "handicap" is considered by many people to be derogatory. The term came into being from the disabled not being able to find work due to a disibiltiy, and asking for hand-outs, often by having people place money in a hat or cap.
I don't personally care one way or the other about the language you or other people use, but I figured it might be worth throwing out there. I beleive the more proper term would be "disabled people" and "accessible bathroom" or "accessible element".

[This message has been edited by Ryan_J (edited 04-29-2004).]
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Salt Lake City

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#87909 - 05/01/04 04:35 AM Re: bathroom receptacles in "other than dwelling units"
PCBelarge Offline
Member

Registered: 06/08/03
Posts: 657
Loc: Dobbs Ferry, NY, USA
Go to Google and type in ADA building requirements and it will lead you to lots of sites that can help with the requirements for the different elements of construction. For wheelchairs there are usually 2 different heights, depending on the approach of the wheelchair - frontal and side.

Pierre
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Pierre Belarge

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