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#86520 - 11/06/03 07:12 PM 210-6 (a)(2) – Origin and interpretation
Hutch Offline

Registered: 05/27/02
Posts: 383
Loc: South Oxfordshire, UK
This enquiry derives from discussions that have occurred on the Non-US forum. The NEC regulation referred to above relates to the prohibition, in dwelling units, of a >120V receptacle (I read 240V) where the plug and cord connected load is less than 1440VA or ΒΌ hp.

In your experience, how is this regulation applied or enforced? It has been said that the NEC ends at the receptacle, and yet the interpretation of this regulation depends on the load placed upon this outlet. At the time of inspection, say in a new house, the intended (>1440VA) load may not even be present, as the regulation does not specify that the load be fixed or stationary.

Your install (or inspection) specifies (has) one NEMA 6-20 in a living room and one above the kitchen counter. You are informed, should you ask, that they are to accommodate a portable 240V, 2200W electric oil heater and a 3kW electric hot water kettle respectively. Do you install/pass or red-ticket and if so why?

In the days (1920’s?) of double β€˜T’ slot receptacles which could be wired for 120 or 240V I can understand this regulation. I furthermore understand 210-6 (a)(1) which prohibits lighting fixtures as the ES shell will be hot with 120-0-120V – but with unique NEMA plug configurations and still only 120V to ground each leg, why does this regulation exist?

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#86521 - 11/08/03 03:43 AM Re: 210-6 (a)(2) – Origin and interpretation
pauluk Offline

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
I don't see how this rule can be enforced that strictly.

Maybe there are locations where it would clearly be ridiculous for there to be a load >1440VA, but in most places if you said that the receptacle was for a 2kW portable whatever, how can anyone say it isn't?

They can't control what you actually plug into it at a later date.

#86522 - 11/08/03 05:03 AM Re: 210-6 (a)(2) – Origin and interpretation
Ron Offline

Registered: 03/13/02
Posts: 577
Loc: White Plains, NY
It is generally unenforcable. The only appliance I find in the kitchen that is cord and plug at >120V is the tea pots from the other side of the water.


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