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#82299 - 11/01/02 03:33 PM 120V tap to 240V branch
stevegalus Offline

Registered: 11/01/02
Posts: 14
Loc: Santa Ana, CA USA
I would like to hardwire a 250W/120V transformer for Low Voltage undercabinet lighting to the microwave outlet, which is 220V/30A. Is this permissible?
Although the oven specs require 30A/220V, the oven only uses 950W (doesn't sound right, but there it is in B&W at www.geappliances/advantium/models). So ampacity should not be a problem.

Second option: Can I install a 120V recepticle instead of hardwiring the transformer, using #10 wire for the tap? Can I use #10 wire with a standard 120V 15A recepticle?


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#82300 - 11/01/02 06:11 PM Re: 120V tap to 240V branch
caselec Offline

Registered: 04/14/02
Posts: 557
Loc: San Jose, CA
Steve - I don't have a spec. sheet in front of me on this oven but the 950 watt's is probably the output of the microwave it is not the input. The reason this unit requires such a large circuit is for the halogen lights it uses for cooking in addition to the microwave function.

You should not connect any lights to this circuit. You need to connect your lighting to a 15 or 20 amp general lighting circuit.
Curt Swartz


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