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#80032 - 02/14/02 04:51 PM Define "ADJACENT"
MVillines Offline
Member

Registered: 01/07/02
Posts: 21
Loc: Henderson
What is the definition of adjacent? Can a receptacle, installed in the bathroom on a partition wall face opposite the basin? This receptacle is within three feet of the basin and also adjacent to the basin. Only problem, there is a wall between the basin and the receptacle.
Can a transfer switch be mounted on the outside wall of a building with the service panel directly behind the transfer switch on the inside of a building? Are the two panels adjacent?

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#80033 - 02/14/02 08:36 PM Re: Define "ADJACENT"
Elzappr Offline
Member

Registered: 12/20/01
Posts: 273
Loc: Oregon
Purely my own opinion, but NO..for both scenarios. Seems more like "close proximity".
Another situation: On a job here in Oregon, roof-top HVAC equipment is supposed to have disconnect means adjacent to the units...but they installed a panel about 100ft from the units! Somehow they got it past the inspector. Apparently the word "adjacent" is too vague for adequate or consistent enforcement!

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#80034 - 02/15/02 03:25 AM Re: Define "ADJACENT"
sparky Offline
Member

Registered: 10/18/00
Posts: 5545
LOL!
would the disco for a motor control meet the definitional intent of 'within sight' if separated by a door w/ a sight glass????


ad·ja·cent
Pronunciation: &-'jA-s&nt
Function: adjective
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin adjacent-, adjacens, present participle of adjacEre to lie near, from ad- + jacEre to lie; akin to Latin jacere to throw -- more at JET
Date: 15th century
1 a : not distant : NEARBY b : having a common endpoint or border c : immediately preceding or following
2 of two angles : having the vertex and one side in common
- ad·ja·cent·ly adverb

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#80035 - 02/15/02 06:42 AM Re: Define "ADJACENT"
MVillines Offline
Member

Registered: 01/07/02
Posts: 21
Loc: Henderson
Elzappr
You have the same opinion as a member of the Technical Correlating Committee. I must question the wording of the NEC because certain panels must be grouped while others must be adjacent, yet they both mean the same?

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#80036 - 02/15/02 12:03 PM Re: Define "ADJACENT"
Joe Tedesco Offline
Member

Registered: 10/07/00
Posts: 3325
Loc: Boston, Massachusetts USA
Get a copy of the NEC Style Manual here:
http://www.nfpa.org/nec/resources/stylemanual/stylemanual.asp

Start sending in proposals to rid the code of the term you question, and others that are considered as being "unenforceable and vague."


Taken from the NEC Style Manual

Table 3.2.1 Possibly Unenforceable and Vague Terms

Acceptable

Adequate

Adjacent

Appreciable

Appropriate

Approximate(ly)

Available

Avoid(ed)

Can

Care

Careful(ly)

Consider(ed)(ation)

Could

Desirable

Easy(ily)

Equivalent(ly)

Familiar

Feasible

Few

Frequent(ly)

Firmly

Generally

Good

Lightly

Likely

Legible(y)

Many

May

Maybe

Might

Most(ly)

Near(ly)

Neat(ly)

Normal(ly)

Note

Periodic(ally)

Practical(ly)

Practices

Prefer(red)

Proper(ly)

Ready(ily)

Reasonable(y)

Safe(ly)(ty)

Satisfactory

Secure(ly)

Several

Significant

Similar

Substantial(ly)

Sufficient(ly)

Suitable

Usual(ly)


[This message has been edited by Joe Tedesco (edited 08-23-2002).]
_________________________
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

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#80037 - 02/15/02 01:37 PM Re: Define "ADJACENT"
Elzappr Offline
Member

Registered: 12/20/01
Posts: 273
Loc: Oregon
Your list should include "impracticable" too!
Is "impracticable" that which costs too much money?

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#80038 - 02/15/02 01:44 PM Re: Define "ADJACENT"
BuggabooBren Offline
Member

Registered: 11/15/01
Posts: 336
Loc: NM
Perhaps the realistic clarification of the appropriate location can only be made if the intent or function and purpose is known for the article being installed. For example, if an emergency shut-off switch is to fulfill its purpose, it must not only be within a reasonable distance, it must be within easy reach - hence, a glass wall or partition is completely out of the question.

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#80039 - 02/15/02 10:21 PM Re: Define "ADJACENT"
Elzappr Offline
Member

Registered: 12/20/01
Posts: 273
Loc: Oregon
Responding to Sparky's query: No. The disconnect has to be in sight FROM the HVAC unit. So a door with a window wouldn't work. I know you were only kidding, but some folks like to push rules to the limit, so they might try to get away with that suggestion.
Mvillines, interesting how the words can get equivocal. I never focused on the way the two expressions are used in the Code for seemingly the same scenario. But, for me,"grouped" means kept close together (where "close" depends on the practical context - as B-Bren mentions), and "adjacent" means being close, but not necessarily TOGETHER, and not necessarily on the same wall space, but perhaps around the inside corner of a wall.
I don't know..does this make sense?

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