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#78391 - 09/17/01 04:17 PM General receptacles
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Let's see if I can ask a question without stirring up too much controversy.....

My data here is a few years old, but this is what I understand is specified by the NEC for general purpose outlets:

A minimum of two 20A branches feeding recepts. in kitchen/dining area, with nothing else allowed on these circuits except a clock or outside W/P socket.

Other recepts. & all lights on either 15A or 20A branches, based on an estimated load of 3 watts per sq. ft. for residential.

Dedicated circuits for washer, dishwasher, garbage disposal.

Is this still the NEC requirement and accepted minimum?

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#78392 - 09/17/01 05:28 PM Re: General receptacles
amp-man Offline
Member

Registered: 06/23/01
Posts: 144
Loc: Sacto, California US of A
Paul,

Pretty close...

-- no outside recep on the small appliance circuits. Only countertop & dining room receps (I suppose because someone might run an electric fry pan or several crock pots in the dining room), and gas stove or clock recep.

--dishwasher and garbage disposal ("garburator" in Canada!) can share a 20A circuit (non-coincident loads).

Yes, the NEC is the "floor" in most urban areas, but many jurisdictions impose more stringent requirements. For instance, the Sacramento, California municipal code is the 1990 (!) NEC by reference but requires one general lighting circuit per 500 sq ft (not the 600 that 3vA/SF works out to). I've heard that Cook County, Illinois (Chicago) requires ALL wiring to be run in metal raceway. One great fire, and boy, do they get conservative! And electricity wasn't even to blame for that one!

I understand that some very rural areas have no city or county codes, and and in that case if there are no state codes referencing the NEC, how you install wiring is between you and the fire insurance company!

BTW, have enjoyed your perspective from the other side of the pond.

Cliff

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#78393 - 09/17/01 06:07 PM Re: General receptacles
sparky Offline
Member

Registered: 10/18/00
Posts: 5545
Paul;
without getting nit picky , you have the basic jist of it. ( the w/p outlet outside is old news, like amp-man says)

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#78394 - 09/18/01 03:40 AM Re: General receptacles
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Thanks for the info. I saw a 1980s book while over there, but the only NEC reference I have here at the moment is a 1977 book, quoting - I think - the 1975 code.

I realized that local city/county codes could extend requirements beyond the NEC. You seem to have much more local decisions on everything than here (not just electrical, e.g. sales tax).

[QUOTE}
--dishwasher and garbage disposal ("garburator" in Canada!) can share a 20A circuit (non-coincident loads).
[/QUOTE]

I thought it was common practice for these to be on a split-wired 120/240V circuit from a double-pole C/B to a duplex with the hot link tag broken off. Do you just use a single 20A 120V branch now then?

"Garburator" sounds like something out of Batman! Over here they're called waste disposals, "garbage" being looked upon as a very American word. Everyone would understand you though.

 Quote:
[B}
BTW, have enjoyed your perspective from the other side of the pond.
[/B]


Glad you've found it interesting. When I run into other elecs or technically-minded people here I try to explain some of the differences in U.S. wiring.

Many think that everything runs on 120V; they don't realize that American homes have 240V as well, for example, and they're mostly unaware of the different color codes, lack of ring circuits, etc.

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#78395 - 09/18/01 09:27 PM Re: General receptacles
amp-man Offline
Member

Registered: 06/23/01
Posts: 144
Loc: Sacto, California US of A
Paul,

Running a multi-wire 20A circuit for the disposal and dishwasher isn't uncommon. But low bid usually gets the job, and a little saving here/a little there adds up. Especially in low-cost starter houses.

Cliff

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#78396 - 09/19/01 03:44 AM Re: General receptacles
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Point taken. At least it's better than the "el cheapo" installations still being done here where we end up with washer, dryer & dishwasher all on the same circuit.

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