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#77836 - 07/17/01 07:35 AM When does the Code apply?
bobl Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 07/17/01
Posts: 1
Loc: Watertown, MA. USA
Joe:

Could you please clarify a question regarding the application of the Code to me? I recently posed the following query to two Electrical Inspectors and two 15 hr. Code Review providers, and received mixed answers. When installing new receptacles (3) in the dining room of an old dwelling shall the installation be done in accordance with 220-4(b) and 210-52(b)? One Inspector and one Code Review instructor said YES and the others said NO, stating that these sections only apply to new construction and not to wiring in older dwellings. I was taught that the Code applied to ALL installations. I have been licensed in MA. for almost 40 years now, have I missed a Code change or am I experiencing a "Senior Moment"? Kindly advise me on this matter.

Thank you.

Bob L.

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#77837 - 07/17/01 07:48 AM Re: When does the Code apply?
sparky66wv Offline
Member

Registered: 11/17/00
Posts: 2342
Loc: West Virginia
I, too, have pondered a similar concern. Went to replace a bulb in a sign the other day and it turned into a complete rewire for the three signs and the circuit feeder. Too many violations to let slide... To make a long story longer, I went to replace the bulbs in the first sign to discover that it had no fixture... the ballasts had been removed and only the sockets remained. The NM (replaced with UF) cable wasn't bushed or clamped in the entrance of the sign, (damp location) no EGC's etc, etc...

Just where am I allowed to stop fixing violations, or do we just rewire entire structures on bulb-change calls?

[This message has been edited by sparky66wv (edited 07-17-2001).]
_________________________
-Virgil
Residential/Commercial Inspector
5 Star Inspections
Member IAEI

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#77838 - 07/17/01 08:55 AM Re: When does the Code apply?
Redsy Offline
Member

Registered: 03/28/01
Posts: 2138
Loc: Bucks County PA
I have similar concerns. Local township inspectors are requirind a receptacle be installed in bath & powder rooms if one doesn't already exist, in order to sell a home. They allow, however to tie into the existing light fixture, that often has a receptacle mounted in it(this must be disconnected). The reasoning is that you are not really adding any additional load, and if it didn't trip before, it won't now. This is not ideal, but on a slab-built home with no overhead access, it would cost hundreds of dollars to run a new circuit versus around $100 to tie in to the fixture and install a GFCI receptacle. The bottom line is that the local AHJ has final say.

[This message has been edited by Redsy (edited 07-17-2001).]

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#77839 - 07/17/01 12:03 PM Re: When does the Code apply?
sparky Offline
Member

Registered: 10/18/00
Posts: 5545
I'm smoking a run down 7 unit this week. The fire inspector walked right by a number of wadsworth main,range&4 , the 4 all being 30A fuses.

I mentioned this to the owner, in writing. I am not going to rat him out to the state, but the balls in his court now.

I have brought up the ugly 'existing' word only to recieve a variety of answers. If I were to install a receptacle(s) in said apartments i have heard NFPA 73 (I Think) mentioned, quoting 2 receptacles per bedroom ( to lessen extention cords).

Bottom line....no ticky, no laundry.

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#77840 - 07/17/01 02:29 PM Re: When does the Code apply?
Joe Tedesco Offline
Member

Registered: 10/07/00
Posts: 3325
Loc: Boston, Massachusetts USA
bobl: First, See Rule 3 in the Massachusetts Electrical Code:

Rule 3. Additions or modifications to an existing installation shall be made in accordance with this Code
without bringing the remaining part of the installation into compliance with the requirements of this Code.

The installation shall not create a violation of this Code, nor shall it increase the magnitude of an existing
violation.

What part of 210-52(b) and 220-4(b) do we want to discuss?

210-52(b) Small Appliances.

1. In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits required by Section 210-11(c)(1) shall serve all receptacle outlets covered by Sections 210-52(a) and (c) and receptacle outlets for refrigeration equipment.

Exception No. 1: In addition to the required receptacles specified by Section 210-52, switched receptacles supplied from a general-purpose branch circuit as defined in Section 210-70(a)(1), Exception No. 1, shall be permitted.

Exception No. 2: The receptacle outlet for refrigeration equipment shall be permitted to be supplied from an individual branch circuit rated 15 amperes or greater.

2. The two or more small-appliance branch circuits specified in (b)(1) shall have no other outlets.

Exception No. 1: A receptacle installed solely for the electrical supply to and support of an electric clock in any of the rooms specified above.

Exception No. 2: Receptacles installed to provide power for supplemental equipment and lighting on gas-fired ranges, ovens, or counter-mounted cooking units.

3. Receptacles installed in a kitchen to serve countertop surfaces shall be supplied by not less than two small-appliance branch circuits, either or both of which shall also be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the same kitchen and in other rooms specified in Section 210-52(b)(1). Additional small-appliance branch circuits shall be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the kitchen and other rooms specified in Section 210-52(b)(1). No small-appliance branch circuit shall serve more than one kitchen.


220-4(b) Inductive Lighting Loads. For circuits supplying lighting units that have ballasts, transformers, or autotransformers, the computed load shall be based on the total ampere ratings of such units and not on the total watts of the lamps.
_________________________
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

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#77841 - 07/17/01 05:03 PM Re: When does the Code apply?
Redsy Offline
Member

Registered: 03/28/01
Posts: 2138
Loc: Bucks County PA
Quote:
Originally posted by Joe Tedesco:
bobl: First, See Rule 3 in the Massachusetts Electrical Code:

Rule 3. Additions or modifications to an existing installation shall be made in accordance with this Code
without bringing the remaining part of the installation into compliance with the requirements of this Code.

The installation shall not create a violation of this Code, nor shall it increase the magnitude of an existing
violation.

What part of 210-52(b) and 220-4(b) do we want to discuss?

210-52(b) Small Appliances.

1. In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits required by Section 210-11(c)(1) shall serve all receptacle outlets covered by Sections 210-52(a) and (c) and receptacle outlets for refrigeration equipment.

Exception No. 1: In addition to the required receptacles specified by Section 210-52, switched receptacles supplied from a general-purpose branch circuit as defined in Section 210-70(a)(1), Exception No. 1, shall be permitted.

Exception No. 2: The receptacle outlet for refrigeration equipment shall be permitted to be supplied from an individual branch circuit rated 15 amperes or greater.

2. The two or more small-appliance branch circuits specified in (b)(1) shall have no other outlets.

Exception No. 1: A receptacle installed solely for the electrical supply to and support of an electric clock in any of the rooms specified above.

Exception No. 2: Receptacles installed to provide power for supplemental equipment and lighting on gas-fired ranges, ovens, or counter-mounted cooking units.

3. Receptacles installed in a kitchen to serve countertop surfaces shall be supplied by not less than two small-appliance branch circuits, either or both of which shall also be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the same kitchen and in other rooms specified in Section 210-52(b)(1). Additional small-appliance branch circuits shall be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the kitchen and other rooms specified in Section 210-52(b)(1). No small-appliance branch circuit shall serve more than one kitchen.


220-4(b) Inductive Lighting Loads. For circuits supplying lighting units that have ballasts, transformers, or autotransformers, the computed load shall be based on the total ampere ratings of such units and not on the total watts of the lamps.


Joe,
Would you mind commenting on the situation I described above.

Thanks,
Redsy

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#77842 - 07/18/01 03:10 PM Re: When does the Code apply?
sparky Offline
Member

Registered: 10/18/00
Posts: 5545
Redsy;
The jist is GFI protection of the bathroom rec. , myself i would offer a GFI breaker for the entire circuit, or run a new circuit at whatever the cost.

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#77843 - 07/18/01 03:18 PM Re: When does the Code apply?
Joe Tedesco Offline
Member

Registered: 10/07/00
Posts: 3325
Loc: Boston, Massachusetts USA
Redsy:

Quote:
Local township inspectors are requiring a receptacle be installed in bath & powder rooms if one doesn't already exist, in order to sell a home.

They allow, however to tie into the existing light fixture, that often has a receptacle mounted in it (this must be disconnected).

The reasoning is that you are not really adding any additional load, and if it didn't trip before, it won't now.

This is not ideal, but on a slab-built home with no overhead access, it would cost hundreds of dollars to run a new circuit versus around $100 to tie in to the fixture and install a GFCI receptacle.

The bottom line is that the local AHJ has final say.


I agree, this is reasonable, just make sure they remove the existing receptacle in the light fixture.

Note: If this was a new circuit it would have to be 20 ampere rated for supply to bathroom receptacle(s) only, and for the supply to all outlets in individual bathrooms it would have to be an individual branch circuit.

See Section 210-11(c)(3) Bathroom Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, at least one 20-ampere branch circuit shall be provided to supply the bathroom receptacle outlet(s). Such circuits shall have no other outlets.

Exception: Where the 20-ampere circuit supplies a single bathroom, outlets for other equipment within the same bathroom shall be permitted to be supplied in accordance with Section 210-23(a).
_________________________
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

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